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Trying to figure out the density of water?

  1. Sep 5, 2010 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    "A steel cylinder of mass 2 kg contains 4.0 L of liquid water at 25 degrees centigrade at 200 kPa. Find the total mass and volume of the system."

    2. Relevant equations
    I know that water at 4 degrees centigrade is approximately 1000 kg/m^3. But how about when it is pressurized and at 25 degrees centigrade?


    3. The attempt at a solution

    I don't know where to start with this one.

    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 5, 2010 #2

    vela

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    You typically have a table or chart in your textbook which has the required info.
     
  4. Sep 5, 2010 #3
    The questions are not from the textbook so the tables do not provide the required information.
     
  5. Sep 5, 2010 #4

    vela

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  6. Sep 5, 2010 #5
    Already been there. Didn't find anything.
     
  7. Sep 6, 2010 #6
    Try this chart, you might find a better one elsewhere:

    http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/fluid-density-temperature-pressure-d_309.html

    To solve the problem:

    What is the water density and, therefore, the water mass ?
    Can you now tell the combined mass ?
    What do you have to know to estimate the volume of the steel cylinder ?
    Can you approximate the steel cylinder height and inner diameter ?
    What about the outer diameter ?
    What will be the combined volume ?
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2010
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