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Tune of a different drummer

  1. Jan 7, 2010 #1
    Please see this English text

    In the the last two decades,corporate america have placed a number of entrepreneurs in the limelight who have marched to the tune of a different drummer.

    I don't get the wording 'to the tune of a different drummer' here . I don't get analogy here .
    Is not drummer beats with hammers to correct tuning of drums . but how does that relate here?
    I don't get the overall meaning.

    any english native speaker or someone knows better english could you please explain this ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 7, 2010 #2

    lisab

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    You should http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/" [Broken]...I hope it's useful to you.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  4. Jan 7, 2010 #3
    Thanks for the link.....I am aware of that site though :)

    anyway, did you get the matching ? I pasted the search key 'tune of a different drummer' over there but no record returned...Let me know if you used any other keywords for this and got matching.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  5. Jan 7, 2010 #4

    tiny-tim

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    Hi momentum! :smile:

    (It's usually "march to the beat of a different drummer" :wink:)

    It means to march at a different speed. :smile:

    (And the drummer is the person who plays the drum, not the person who tunes it.)
     
  6. Jan 7, 2010 #5

    lisab

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    It's usually used as "march to the tune of a different drummer" and it means to be different, unique...often quirky.
     
  7. Jan 7, 2010 #6
    still have some hesitation ... not completely clear . Let me explain the hiccups

    it says "different drummer" ( // drummer are the person who beats the drums ... different drummer ...so many drummers here say logically )

    I have seen republic day celebration in our country on TV , troops march forward with the beats of different drummer (?) ( many drummers are there in the troops ) ......is it same thing ?


    Now coming to back to the usage here . it says ...a number of entrepreneurs in the limelight who have marched to the tune of a different drummer

    umm ...now things are not clear ... entrepreneurs are marching forward with the tune/beat of a drummer .....confused here . by the way I don't like the word 'tune' ....like 'beat' though...unfortunately they are using 'tune' here.

    any comments ?
     
  8. Jan 7, 2010 #7

    tiny-tim

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    Yes … it's like the cartoon of someone watching a parade and saying "Look, my son is the only one who's in step! :approve:"

    Soldiers march to the beat of a drum.

    So, if one soldier is out of step, he must be marching to the beat of a different (imaginary) drum. :wink:
     
  9. Jan 7, 2010 #8

    BobG

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    The proper phrase is "beat of a different drummer" since a person marching to a drum of a different tune would be indistinguishable from the other marchers as long as the beat was the same.

    People imitate what has been successful for other people. To the point that schools even teach these things to their students, meaning the overwhelming majority of people in a career field or a business wind up doing things exactly the same.

    Their processes become so similar that it almost seems as if they're all marching in step to the same drummer.

    If one person is doing something radically different from his competitiors, he stands out in the same way a person marching out of step would (Except if you were actually talking about people marching across a field, it wouldn't be polite to say the person marching out of step was an idiot. It would be kinder to say he must be listening to the beat of a different drummer - some imaginary drummer only he can hear.)

    In other words, if a person is marching to the beat of a different drummer, then he's doing things in a non-standard way; doing things in a way other people wouldn't try.
     
  10. Jan 7, 2010 #9

    Evo

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    Momentum, remember what I told you, no more new threads for these questions, I will allow you to do this as long as all questions keep going into the "same" thread, maybe you thought that meant going forward, so I will let this one slide.

    Lisab is correct, all the quote means is that the person does their own thing, they don't follow the rules everyone else does, and they might be considered different or unusual.

    They probably got the idea for the saying from Thoreau's book Walden.

    Or from a popular song by Linda Rondstadt. :tongue:

    You are taking the words too literally, and if you do that, you will miss the intended meaning.

    Edit: I see BobG has provided an excellent explanation.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2010
  11. Jan 7, 2010 #10
    yea, I remember . the reason I did not was this would become highly inconvenient for others to post because it would be hard to find the start and end of the discussion really . As these questions are varied hence the complete structure will be a chaos. And people will loose interest browsing pages after pages and post replies. So keeping them separate will simplify the life a lot...you must be knowing this technically.
    Had it been a single question , there would have been definitely no problem at all. Anyway, I just raised my concern . If you are still stringent about your rules , then I have to quit from this forum because I'll loose interest gradually here for no replies. good thing is every time I get some nice replies and so I come back ... to learn more...to do something better....I understand as you are the Mod/Forum owner , your words are the last talk here.

    Yea, just read BobG , Lisab Explanation ...things are making sense now....good discussion.
    Thanks guys
     
  12. Jan 7, 2010 #11

    Evo

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    I can't have you cluttering the forum with a separate thread for each one sentence definition that you want. Every time you ask a new question your thread will be bumped up and people will see it and respond, if they are so inclined.

    You may have a single thread for your questions. Other people confine themselves to single threads where they post multiple new entries, you must do the same. Unless it is an entirely new topic that warrants a new thread for a new discussion, please continue to post all new definition requests in *this* thread.
     
  13. Jan 7, 2010 #12
    Ok. I'll check it out .

    though , I doubt this system. but anyway , let me experience this . So far all of my threads have been replied adequately . If this new system works the same way then I have no issue at all. After all , learning is the purpose ... it does not matter in what form . I accept this proposal . I'll post new question in this thread and will observe the progress.
    Thanks for the suggestion.
     
  14. Jan 7, 2010 #13

    BobG

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    I'd take quotes from Thoreau and Rondstadt over my explanation any day.
     
  15. Jan 8, 2010 #14
    Please see this English text...

    enterpreneurs showed that bigger isn’t always better and that the legacy systems and bureaucratic practices of most established firms can be like anvils that keep them from keeping pace with changes in the marketplace

    Is not http://www.wordwebonline.com/search.pl?w=anvil"means 'iron block'

    what it is doing here . ... see the usage 'like anvils that keep them from keeping pace with changes in the marketplace'

    Not quite clear as to what does it mean by 'keeping pace with changes in the marketplace'

    Can anyone understand this english part ? Can you please explain this .
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  16. Jan 8, 2010 #15

    lisab

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    That's an unusual use of the word 'anvil,' so I understand your confusion. I take it to mean 'a burden' in this context.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  17. Jan 8, 2010 #16

    Evo

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    An anvil is heavy and difficult to move. What they're saying is that old pratices can tie you down and/or hold you back.

    In other words, prevent you from changing, moving forward, etc...

    Were there no anvils in your culture?
     
  18. Jan 8, 2010 #17
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/KPvqFkCtAqw&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param [Broken] name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/KPvqFkCtAqw&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  19. Jan 8, 2010 #18
    Ok.... Feeling better now...that makes sense now.
    Thanks for the post.
     
  20. Jan 8, 2010 #19

    BobG

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    What country's English are these people using? "Tune of a different drum"; carrying around "anvils"; ......

    The American terms would be "anchor" or "a ball and chain". Either way, the article means that the burdens of their business practices can sometimes outweigh the benefits.

    From the little snippet you've provided, I assume the article says these disadvantages are inherent in big organizations and, therefore, unavoidable. They need standardization in order for the different departments to work together. The larger the company, the harder it is to maintain that standardization and the more bureaucratic overhead a company carries around trying to maintain that standardization.

    Humans work best in small groups (in fact, humans could be considered to be small group primates). The larger the group, the harder it is for us to make it work very efficiently.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  21. Jan 8, 2010 #20
    This is from a book

    Extraordinary Entrepreneurship: The Professional’s Guide to Starting an Exceptional Enterprise, by Stephen C. Harper (Wiley Publishing, 2004).

    I am a voracious reader . love to read books , journals , articles of interests .
     
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