Turbulent Natural Convection with Condensation

  1. Hello,

    I'm thinking about a natural convection problem where you have turbulent flow on a vertical wall. It's compressible flow, and it's a two-phase problem. You have two boundary layers, one for the air-vapor mixture, and one for the condensate.

    The question I'm pondering is this:

    Only water penetrates the liquid-gas interface since the vapor condenses. Usually in single-phase problems, the molecular-based properties of viscosity and thermal diffusivity dominate at the wall, since the eddys aren't present there.

    In this case, I have fluid flowing through a so-called "wall" (i.e. no-slip boundary conditions don't hold; there's flow through the normal direction to the "wall".). Does that also hold? I'm leaning more toward the interface properties of the mixture being eddy-based, and not just molecular.

    So, for example,

    viscosity at the interface= molecular viscosity + turbulent viscosity

    Is this a viable thought?
     
  2. jcsd
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