Two sides of a same coin. But how?

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In summary: Electric and magnetic effects are intertwined in relativity, making it the most complete understanding of electromagnetism to date.two sides of a same coin. but how??In summary, electricity and magnetism are two sides of the same coin. However, one needs to be able to understand Maxwell's equations in order to appreciate this fact. Induction is the process of magnetism moving to see an electric field.Electricity and magnetism are said to be "two sides of a same coin". But can anybody help me understand the actual relation between electric and magnetic fields and that how does electromagnetic induction works?
  • #1
sstp
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Two sides of a same coin. But how??

You are perhaps confused by the title, isn't it?
Well let me tell you what the question is.

Electricity and Magnetism are said to be "two sides of a same coin". But can anybody help me understand the actual relation between electric and magnetic fields and that how does electromagnetic induction works?

In short, I want to know how were the two phenomena- Electricity and Magnetism, unified into a single theory called 'ELECTROMAGNETISM'
 
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  • #2
If I point to you the Maxwell Equations, would that be sufficient?

Zz.
 
  • #3
Yes, Maxwell's equations will give you the answer. Unfortunately, you have to be able to UNDERSTAND Maxwell's equations to appreciate that. Short answer (in English) is that a changing electric field has an associated magnetic field and a changing magnetic field induces an electric field.
 
  • #4
Add to that the insights of special relativity and you'll see that what one observer sees as an electric field will appear as a magnetic field to a moving observer. In relativity, electric and magnetic fields are interwoven.
 
  • #5
sstp said:
Electricity and Magnetism are said to be "two sides of a same coin". But can anybody help me understand the actual relation between electric and magnetic fields and that how does electromagnetic induction works?


Magnetism is what you see when the electric field is moving compared to you.
Induction is the other side of that coin- When magnetism is moving compared
to you, you also see an electric field.
 
  • #6
The simplest practical explanation: A wire with an electrical current through it produces a magnetic field in the surrounding space.

It is worth mentioning maxwell's equations have that two sides of the same coin aspect, as well as predicting that light itself is a wave of electric and magnetic fields.

The ultimate unification comes from Einstein's Special Relativity, which shows how electric and magnetic fields are the same thing seen from different points of view.
 

What does "two sides of a same coin" mean?

The phrase "two sides of a same coin" is commonly used to describe two things that are closely related or connected in some way, even though they may seem different on the surface.

How are two things considered "two sides of a same coin"?

Two things can be considered "two sides of a same coin" if they have a common underlying factor or principle that connects them. This could be a shared purpose, goal, or characteristic.

Why is it important to understand the concept of "two sides of a same coin"?

Understanding that two things can be "two sides of a same coin" can help us see the bigger picture and recognize the interconnectedness of things. It can also help us to better understand and appreciate the complexities of a situation or issue.

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How can the concept of "two sides of a same coin" be applied in science?

In science, the concept of "two sides of a same coin" can be applied in various ways. For example, it can be used to explain the dual nature of particles in quantum mechanics or the complementary relationship between genetics and environment in biology. It can also be used to describe the interconnectedness of different scientific disciplines and the need for a holistic approach in research and problem-solving.

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