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Two water tanks

  1. Jul 17, 2012 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    There are two tanks with water, there are standing very close to each other. Tank 1 is having a temperature of 0 degrees and tank 2 is having a temperature of 10 degrees. The heatflow between the two is Q1. Then tank two is getting a temperature of 100 degrees. That heatflow we will call Q2. The question is: By what degree will the ratio Q2/Q1 chance?


    2. Relevant equations

    I don't know really...

    3. The attempt at a solution

    So I used Q=cA(T14-T24). c and A are some constants that are the same for both tanks so cA=C. Then I put the temperatures in the formula making it:
    Q1=C*104 and Q2=C*1004 Then deviding them to get: 1004/104=1*104 (the constant C disappears). So my answer would be 1*104 And the answer is supposted to be 16, which sounds much more normal to me. But I have no idea how to get here...
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 17, 2012 #2

    TSny

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    What unit should you be using for T?
     
  4. Jul 17, 2012 #3
    celcius, sorry forgot to say
     
  5. Jul 17, 2012 #4

    TSny

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    Is it ok to use Celsius unit in the formula, or does the formula require that you use another unit?
     
  6. Jul 17, 2012 #5
    I don't really know extally, can try to do it in Kelvin as the last time I did it in celsius... lets see.

    then it becomes: (373^4) / (283^4) = 3,018. That's also not alright, so it must be something else. Might be a total differend formula, I really don't know...
     
  7. Jul 17, 2012 #6

    TSny

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    Did you also convert the 0 oC to Kelvin?
     
  8. Jul 17, 2012 #7
    aaaah I forgot ^^'
    ((373^4) - (273^4)) / ((273^4) - (283^4)) = -16,1... Oke thanks a lot ^^" That was pretty stupit of me... But I will not do that wrong again for quite some time :P

    thanks again:)
     
  9. Jul 17, 2012 #8

    TSny

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    We've all learned that lesson the hard way. :biggrin:
     
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