UCLA's Scholars Program

  • #1
thrill3rnit3
Gold Member
713
1
UCLA has this thing called Scholar's Program, in which one can obtain both his/her bachelor's and master's degree in 5 years.

From UCLA's Math Department Website

http://www.math.ucla.edu/ugrad/scholpr.shtml

The Mathematics Departmental Scholar program is the Department’s most rigorous program and is intended to prepare students for graduate school.

In this program students have the opportunity to complete both a Bachelors (BS) and Masters (MA) in a finite amount of time, ideally four years. The granting of the Masters Degree is contingent upon the completion of graduate level coursework and passing of the Basic Qualifying Exam.

It is recommended that students who attempt this program follow a timeline as such:

First year at UCLA: Complete or have credit from another institution/standardized test (AP or IB Exams) all lower-division Calculus-based courses (Math 31A, 31B, 32A, 32B, 33A, 33B). If possible take 115AH in spring.

Second year at UCLA: Complete Math 115AH (Honors Linear Algebra), Math 115B (Linear Algebra), Math 131AH (Honors Analysis) and 131BH (Honors Analysis). Completion of these courses will provide a strong foundation for the Basic Qualifying Exam, which is a crucial component of completing the Scholars program. Students are encouraged to apply to
the Departmental Scholar program upon completion of 115B and 131BH.

Third Year at UCLA: Pass the Basic Qualifying Exam. Complete other major courses, these particular courses will depend on whether the student is pure or applied. Students can also begin their graduate courses as well.

Fourth year at UCLA: Complete remaining graduate level courses for the Masters Degree.

Successful completion of this course plan, graduate level courses (minimum 8/maximum 11 for the Masters) and the Basic Qualifying Exam will result in the granting of the BS/MA concurrently.

If you have further questions, please contact the Undergraduate Mathematics Student Services Office [email protected].

My question, I guess, would be should I do this thing if I decide to go to UCLA?
What are the advantages and disadvantages to this?
If I continue on to my doctoral degree, would other institutions see this as a plus or a minus?

My primary main concern is that other schools might think that I rushed into getting my degree, therefore not being able to take other classes that would help me greatly.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
389
0
It would be a very small "plus" for admissions to graduate school...

It would also, probably make you ineligible for many of the fellowships that support (US CITIZENS ONLY) graduate students early on in their studies...

I did a similar program and have had some troubles since then since I'm no longer eligible to apply for many fellowships, despite the fact that my 4 yr BS-MS program was in no way equivalent to a "real graduate program"...
 
  • #3
4
0
I'm a freshman at UCLA majoring in Mathematics and have been thinking about doing the Scholars Program as well. Can anyone else perhaps offer their opinions on the matter? :D

Thanks in advance,
Alex.
 
  • #4
Choppy
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
Insights Author
4,687
1,857
Pros:
- I like the idea of a qualifying exam in a major. I think this would really help advanced students to solidify the material.
- The program allows students to take graduate level courses if they are so inclined.

Cons:
- I don't see the word "thesis" anywhere - hence you have a course-based master's degree, which doesn't give you the opportunity to develop the research skills that graduate work is supposed to foster.
- Jumping to graduate level course-work in such a short time will likely require a LOT of work. This might mean that you miss out on other opportunities through your education such as involvement with social clubs, volunteer work, part-time jobs, sports, etc. And it's important to remember that the skills you pick up and contacts you make in extra-cirricular work can have a significant role in your future career decisions.
 
  • #5
thrill3rnit3
Gold Member
713
1
Pros:
- I like the idea of a qualifying exam in a major. I think this would really help advanced students to solidify the material.
- The program allows students to take graduate level courses if they are so inclined.

Cons:
- I don't see the word "thesis" anywhere - hence you have a course-based master's degree, which doesn't give you the opportunity to develop the research skills that graduate work is supposed to foster.
- Jumping to graduate level course-work in such a short time will likely require a LOT of work. This might mean that you miss out on other opportunities through your education such as involvement with social clubs, volunteer work, part-time jobs, sports, etc. And it's important to remember that the skills you pick up and contacts you make in extra-cirricular work can have a significant role in your future career decisions.

is what cincinnatus said a couple of posts before valid??

It would also, probably make you ineligible for many of the fellowships that support (US CITIZENS ONLY) graduate students early on in their studies...

I did a similar program and have had some troubles since then since I'm no longer eligible to apply for many fellowships, despite the fact that my 4 yr BS-MS program was in no way equivalent to a "real graduate program"...
 

Related Threads on UCLA's Scholars Program

  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
3K
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
0
Views
171
Replies
4
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
3K
Replies
0
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
0
Views
2K
Replies
0
Views
943
Top