Ugh, Canada! Our Northern Neighbor Is Aiming to Make Internet Privacy a Lot Less Priv

  1. Greg Bernhardt

    Staff: Admin

    Ars Technica reported on a developing story out of Canada this week that should worry many Internet privacy advocates.* The country’s conservative party, which took over control of their parliament this spring, seeks to broadly expand the government’s power.* The … Continue reading →[​IMG]

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  2. jcsd
  3. turbo

    turbo 7,366
    Gold Member

    Re: Ugh, Canada! Our Northern Neighbor Is Aiming to Make Internet Privacy a Lot Less

    The NSA probably has this capability already, Greg. It's not something they would advertise, but I'll bet that it is already in widespread use.
     
  4. Re: Ugh, Canada! Our Northern Neighbor Is Aiming to Make Internet Privacy a Lot Less

    Not legally.
     
  5. Re: Ugh, Canada! Our Northern Neighbor Is Aiming to Make Internet Privacy a Lot Less

    I haven't heard anything about this. LEts hope the report is wrong. One thing that makes the linked article increadibly bad is the name of the bill wasn't given. Without a bill name fact checking is difficult.
     
  6. Re: Ugh, Canada! Our Northern Neighbor Is Aiming to Make Internet Privacy a Lot Less

    I also found the storey in the toronto sun but it seems kind of speculative to me given there is now bill yet and the conservatives didn't say much about what they are going to propose.
     
  7. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Ugh, Canada! Our Northern Neighbor Is Aiming to Make Internet Privacy a Lot Less

    I don't think we should continue the auto link from that guy's blog, but it's not my forum. With an auto link, we have no idea what the guy is blogging and can't check it for credibility.

    It also looks like Greg is posting the blog, but he's not, it's an auto feed.
     
  8. Re: Ugh, Canada! Our Northern Neighbor Is Aiming to Make Internet Privacy a Lot Less

    Well, the story does come from a fairly major paper but it is not from a paper I respect much. Anyway, I have no strong opinion about whether the forum should or should not continue the auto posting. My biggest complaint about the blog post is that it didn’t say much about the source of information.
     
  9. Re: Ugh, Canada! Our Northern Neighbor Is Aiming to Make Internet Privacy a Lot Less

    There are people who write about certain subjects such as a news reporter or a sports reporter. A sports reporter would be attached to the sports departmentment, copy desk, or whatever. Parliamentary Bureau is just a fancy way of saying she is a political reporter.
     
  10. Re: Ugh, Canada! Our Northern Neighbor Is Aiming to Make Internet Privacy a Lot Less

    Just to update this thread a bit; the bill has finally reached parliament. I will repeat myself here on how I think it goes against the Canadian Charter of rights and freedoms:

    http://thepeacearch.com/forum/polit...icism-biggest-threat-canada-2.html#post347317

    My understanding is that the United States has a similar controversy with regards to the patriot act. The drafters of the Canadian Charter of rights and freedoms tried to make privacy protection stronger by not including a place (i.e. home and papers) like was done in the United States Constitution. However, this has actually weakened this part of the act because in the United Dtates specifying home and papers gave absolute strength to these aspects of privacy in America.

    It is easier to overturn aspects of the Canadian charter of rights and freedoms then the United States constitution because of the notwithstanding clause (not sure of the exact impact).

    It is interesting that this thread started some debate here of how relevant blog articles were. The initial blog did not specify it’s source. The actual media source seemed speculative but in the end turned out to be correct. I am curious as to whether this is luck or if the media was leaked information. When the media is leaked information it makes it difficult for readers to tell how valid the story is. I wonder what proper practices should be with regards to media leaks.
     
  11. Re: Ugh, Canada! Our Northern Neighbor Is Aiming to Make Internet Privacy a Lot Less

    I think the "notwithstanding clause" was intended for purposes which had public support. Such as Quebec's language laws and Saskatchewan's back to work legislation for government employees, both back in the eighties. Plus the clause has a five year limitation. I would think that any legislation that invokes the notwithstanding clause would require wide public support. As an aside, I'm pretty sure the Federal government itself has never invoked the clause because it was also intended to satisfy more regional (provincial) interests rather than national ones. Also, the courts struck down the province of Alberta's invocation of the clause for its attempt to define marriage. It's a tough clause to invoke.
     
  12. Re: Ugh, Canada! Our Northern Neighbor Is Aiming to Make Internet Privacy a Lot Less

    That's' interesting. Thankyou :)

    Doing some reading. It seems that United States courts based the reasonable expectation of privacy initially on risk analysis

    http://www.bileta.ac.uk/Document Li...e Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.pdf

    If I remember what I read I think at first Canada ruled this way in the case or Wier but in later decisions used different principles. Here are some quotes from the above link.


    I guess what we should keep in mind that once a warrant is obtained there is no protection of privacy as that constitutes reasonable search. Wire tapping laws do not need as much basis in terms of probably cause but do require more stringent justification in other areas such as public risk (e.g. terrorism). A big issue with wire tapping rules is they aren't usually rejected so this can circumvent privacy but it doesn't mean all information obtained will be admissible in court. Also one must distinguish between what is open to the public vs private communication. Encryption would certainly help to establish the privacy of communications. Emails on the other hand may be grated privacy along the lines as first class mail but I am not sure if the courts have ruled on this yet.

    As for ISPs storing your date, the best I can see from the above is an implied confidentiality agreement but perhaps the proposed bill would undermine this line of defense. I am not sure what protection a confidentiality agreement gives you in court.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2011
  13. Re: Ugh, Canada! Our Northern Neighbor Is Aiming to Make Internet Privacy a Lot Less

    Here's some stuff about the admissibility of wiretapping evidence in court. However, it was written in 1990 and to understand it fully one would need to reference the sections of the law referenced in the quote:

    http://www.hrcr.org/safrica/privacy/r_garofoli.html

    The following section is more cleare

    The following is about when an informer can be cross examined to determine the validity of a wartent obtained for a wire tap:

     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2011
  14. Re: Ugh, Canada! Our Northern Neighbor Is Aiming to Make Internet Priv

    I'm surprised to see an American concerned about Canadian Law. We Canadians have lost a lot of rights and freedoms in the last decade for sure, but nothing like what the Americans have. In Canada we now have American style asset forfeiture laws at the provincial level. The laws came on the books about 2005 and were kept dormant for the next five years. Now people can lose theirs homes if they are just accused of being a criminal. We also have laws that prevent many individuals from making a living. New laws regarding doing electrical work in a home have put many home renovators out of business. One poor fellow got charged for doing now illegal electrical work and had to defend himself in a court room that was 4 hours drive from his home. He failed to successfully defend himself and ended up with a fine of about $25,000. He is out of business. This internet intrusion bill planned by the Conservative Government got overturned for the time being.
    My fear is that when the U.S.A. finally comes crashing down, Canada will be the bug it lands on. I also wouldn't be very surprised if the U.S.A. recovers and remains the top world power for another 100 years. All Americans have to do is crush their corrupt government and replace it with one that will allow the people to prosper and not corporations. I still can't believe the government gave the money to the banks and not the people. The debt went to the people. See http://www.usdebtclock.org/.
    Sorry for my rant.
     
  15. Re: Ugh, Canada! Our Northern Neighbor Is Aiming to Make Internet Priv

    Canadian police haven't needed a warrent to surviel you electronically since 2009, I believe.

    I think we've grown somewhat complacent and the people in power are taking advantage of that fact.

    Remember the "do-not-call" list? The government sponsored a program where you could enter your phone number on a .gov website in order to prevent calls from Canadian telemarketers.
    Within months, the government began selling this list to foreign telemarketers. We were scammed by our own government, with no apology or acknowledgement.
     
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