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UK, GB, England?

  1. Jul 29, 2003 #1

    Monique

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    I always wonder how to properly distinguise between the United Kingdom, Great Britain, and England?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 29, 2003 #2

    jcsd

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    England is a (the main) constituent country/kingdom of the UK, the UK is the name of the country covering England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. Great Britain is the largest Island in the British Isles which contains the mainlands of England, Wales and Scotland.
     
  4. Jul 29, 2003 #3

    Monique

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    ahh, so great britain doesn't include northern ireland? But then I wonder why they write UK in publications as the country of origin.. why don't they say England (or Wales, Scotland, N Ireland for that matter)?
     
  5. Jul 29, 2003 #4

    jcsd

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    Because the UK is the nation-state, so that is our offical nationality. But you shopuld be careful to make sure that you don't call someone from Wales/Scotland/NI English, as they may take offence.
     
  6. Jul 29, 2003 #5

    Monique

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    Ah, so you say that the UK is your nationality, but that wouldn't mean that a person from the UK is British right? Since N-Ireland doesn't belong to Great Britain.. so what do you call a person from the UK?

    I am ashamed of asking this, since you are my neighbour, but exactly how are England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland united in the UK and why does N-Ireland not belong to Great Britain?
     
  7. Jul 29, 2003 #6

    jcsd

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    No, if your from Northern Ireland your still British, Graet Britain is just the largest Island in the British Isles (though yur not British f your from Ireland).

    Tony Blair is the prime minster of the UK, Scotland and Northern Ireland recently got there own parliments (though they both still send MPs to Westminster which is the parliament and executive power for the whole of the UK) and have heads of these parliaments. Wales also recently obtained what is calle a 'regional assembly', howevr this has far less powers than the parliments in Scotland and Northern Ireland. Obviously the exact constitutional situation and history is complex to say the least but bascially the UK is governed as one but some powers are devolved to regional instituions.
     
  8. Jul 29, 2003 #7

    Monique

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    Thanks so much for explaining that, I haven't been in Europe for three years now and kinda lost track of the whole situation :)
     
  9. Jul 29, 2003 #8

    selfAdjoint

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    I believe that a very long time ago the island that is now called Ireland was known as Little Britain or Lesser Britain, because it was smaller than Great Brittan.

    Did you know that Homer wrote of the "pretonic" islands?
     
  10. Jul 29, 2003 #9
    Not at all unusual. We have a 3 tiered system of government in the us, of City government, state(or province if you prefer)government, and federal, or national government. City governments have the least power, federal the most.
     
  11. Jul 30, 2003 #10
    How does the parliament system work in Holland?

    Is there any difference between Holland and the Netherlands?

    What are the main taxes in Holland?
     
  12. Jul 30, 2003 #11

    Monique

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    Those are a lot of questions, let me start out by saying that Holland are just two provinces (north and south) which historically played an important role in the economy of the country.

    How does the parliament work.. I have no clue how to explain that in English.. we are based on a Democratic Monarchy, if that term exists. The Queen is the head of the country and chooses the prime minister. That prime minister will choose a bunch of ministers which will form the first chamber. Than there is a second chamber with political figures chosen by the country. Pretty much the same as the UK?

    The main taxes? What do you mean?
     
  13. Jul 30, 2003 #12
    In UK, it is a democracy in which politicians are voted for by the public. The prime minister is the leader of the ruling political party. This is not associated with the Queen at all other than for ceremonial reasons only.
    The second chamber is the House of Lords, in which Lords are appointed. This gives a bit more stability.

    I mean which taxes do you have to pay if you are working in Holland. Which % of wages gets directly paid to the state? What other taxes are there?
     
  14. Jul 30, 2003 #13
    So that it is correct that the queen and rest of the royal house have no actual politcal power?
     
  15. Jul 30, 2003 #14

    jcsd

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    Yes, the Queen's power is ceremonial only and none of the royals can even vote in an election and re also forbidden (this isn't a law more like a self-enforced set of guidline) from making any statements that could be construed as political.
     
  16. Jul 30, 2003 #15
    The royal family could get rid of the governement if they wanted too, but the likelyhood of that happening is very very slim.
     
  17. Jul 30, 2003 #16

    Monique

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    Well, good question.. I had some small jobs to get me through college and the taxes are automatically paid for those, I never paid much attention to that. I got my real first job in the United States and have been dealing with the taxes over there.. City, State, Federal.
     
  18. Jul 30, 2003 #17

    Tom Mattson

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    Hmmmm, I don't ever recall seeing the episode where the Simpsons go to the UK...
     
  19. Oct 15, 2003 #18

    sp

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    England, Britain, UK

    It annoys me how much people use Great Britain, England UK etc to all mean the same thing, and have you ever noticed the difference between a British and UK flag?
     
  20. Oct 15, 2003 #19

    jimmy p

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    Yeah i actually prefer to be called english than British tho British is much more correct seeing as i am half Gibraltarian. However thre is technically no 'British' Flag. On the Union Flag (it is not really called the union jack) there is the English Cross and the Scottish Flag on there. No Welsh flag or N.I flag. In fact the N.I flag is just the St. Georges Cross with a crown and some hand in the middle which shows they pledge loyalty to England and not Britain...how odd
     
  21. Oct 15, 2003 #20

    dduardo

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    Yeah, haven't you seen the movie Johnny English?
     
  22. Oct 15, 2003 #21

    Monique

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    Actually, I met a Scottish woman a few weeks ago. She was introduced to be as been Brittish, with a lot of emphasis :) Then the introducer jokingly told me that they used to introduce her as been english, which she didn't used to appreciate. I guess there is a lot of confusion out there on this matter, I am glad I cleared it up for myself :)
     
  23. Oct 15, 2003 #22

    Monique

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    Joke:

    Three guys, one Irish, one English, and one Scottish, are out walking along the beach together one day. They come across a lantern and a Genie pops out of it. "I will give you each one wish, that's three wishes in total", says the Genie.

    The Scottish guy says, "I am a fisherman, my Dad's a fisherman, his Dad was a fisherman and my son will be one too. I want all the oceans full of fish for all eternity." So, with a blink of the Genie's eye "FOOM" the oceans were teaming with fish.

    The Englishman was amazed, so he said, "I want a wall around England, protecting her, so that no one will get in for all eternity. Again, with a blink of the Genie's eye "POOF" there was a huge wall around England.

    The Irishman asks, "I'm very curious. Please tell me more about this wall." The Genie explains, "well, it's about 150 feet high, 50 feet thick, protecting England so that nothing can get in or out."

    The Irishman says, "Fill it up with water."
     
  24. Oct 15, 2003 #23

    jimmy p

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    Lol usually the Scottish are adamant that they are SCOTTISH and not British...its strange how some ppl class themselves...most english people are happy to say they are British (except when ANY World Cup is on) but the other countries are too proud to admit it...except of course the scottish woman u met Monique lol :smile:

    Lets see if i have a joke for you!

    Three men are sitting in the maternity ward of a hospital waiting for the imminent birth of their respective children. One is an Englishman, one a Welshman and the other a West Indian. They are all very nervous and pacing the floor - as you do in these situations.

    All of a sudden the doctor bursts through the double doors saying

    "Gentlemen you won't believe this but your wives have all had their babies within 5 minutes of each other."

    The men are beside themselves with happiness and joy.

    "And", said the doctor, "They have all had little boys."

    The fathers are ecstatic and congratulate each other over and over.

    "However we do have one slight problem," the doctor said. "In all the confusion we may have mixed the babies up getting them to the nursery and would be grateful if you could join us there to try and help identify them."

    With that the Englishman raced past the doctor and bolted to the nursery. Once inside he picked up a dark skinned infant with dreadlocks saying,"There's no doubt about it, this boy is mine!"

    The doctor looked bewildered and said, "Well sir of all the babies I would have thought that maybe this child could be of West Indian descent."

    "Maybe", said the Englishman, "but one of the other two is f**cking Welsh and I'm not taking the risk."

    Nothin like a little tension between the countries isnt there?
     
  25. Oct 15, 2003 #24
    Nice one jimmyp,

    I'm afraid not.
     
  26. Oct 15, 2003 #25
    Aren't the Scottish, Welsh and Irish the original inhabitants of the British Isles? I seem to recall that they have a genetic relationship with the Basque, while the English are predominately Germanic, i.e., Norman and Saxon.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 15, 2003
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