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Um um um

  1. Jan 17, 2004 #1
    um um um....

    Where can you use protium, tritium and deuterium?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 17, 2004 #2

    selfAdjoint

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    Protium, you mean hydrogen molecules? Deuterium and tritium are used in nuclear physics. D2O is "heavy water", used as a moderator in some reactors. And Deuterium and Tritium play a big role in fusion, both at the H-bomb level and in the attempts to build fusion power systems.

    Tritium is also used to make glow in the dark things. Like wristwatches that can give you a nice little dose.
     
  4. Jan 19, 2004 #3
    Thanks sA. Are these available on the market?
     
  5. Jan 19, 2004 #4

    Monique

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    [?] Just what are you constructing?
     
  6. Jan 20, 2004 #5
    I am very interested in chemistry. I am not constructing something. It seems illegal to ask if they are available on the market. I could always go ask in a chemists shop, but I am asking here first no matter how suspicious I may sound.
     
  7. Jan 20, 2004 #6

    selfAdjoint

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    You might be able to buy heavy water at retail, but I'll bet you'd have to have a license to buy Tritium, it's a dangerous commodity- radioactive. Hydrogen, the molecular form of your protium, is available freely as a gas in pressure tanks. It's inflammable.
     
  8. Jan 21, 2004 #7

    Monique

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    Well, it is not everyday that someone wants to buy unknown chemical substances
     
  9. Jan 21, 2004 #8
    I know, Monique. A little x
     
  10. Jan 21, 2004 #9
    Most chemical supply companies do sell isotopes (gas, liquid, solid) in a variety of contexts. Although I suspect most are used to dealing with academic/industrial/government clients for the most part. :) I've bought isotopes, but it's been for research purposes.

    In terms of usage, deuterium is also quite common among people for utilization in spectroscopy, esp. NMR. I believe biochemists have used tritium as a radiolabel for tracking the fate of metabolites in the past, although I am not aware of how common the practice may still be in current research.
     
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