Uncertainty of results

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I am trying to figure out how to refer to two overlapping uncertainty results. I have to write a conclusion and I find it difficult to explain. Even now it may seem unclear as to what I am referring to so I will provide an example. This is directly from my conclusion.

'The 72 rated golf ball had a higher power transfer ratio of 1.482 (±0.197) and that of the 98 rated ball had a ratio of 1.343 (±0.287).'

The two results 'overlap'. How do I refer to this? These are two different results for two difference independent variables.
 

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  • #2
I am trying to figure out how to refer to two overlapping uncertainty results. I have to write a conclusion and I find it difficult to explain. Even now it may seem unclear as to what I am referring to so I will provide an example. This is directly from my conclusion.

'The 72 rated golf ball had a higher power transfer ratio of 1.482 (±0.197) and that of the 98 rated ball had a ratio of 1.343 (±0.287).'

The two results 'overlap'. How do I refer to this? These are two different results for two difference independent variables.
I don't know what they are looking for, but I would say that the 72 probably has a higher power transfer ratio but considerable doubt remains. The exact probability that the 98 is better is hard to calculate, so I think they don't want that. Maybe you could draw a graph that would demonstrate the uncertainty.
 
  • #3
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I am trying to figure out how to refer to two overlapping uncertainty results. I have to write a conclusion and I find it difficult to explain. Even now it may seem unclear as to what I am referring to so I will provide an example. This is directly from my conclusion.

'The 72 rated golf ball had a higher power transfer ratio of 1.482 (±0.197) and that of the 98 rated ball had a ratio of 1.343 (±0.287).'

The two results 'overlap'. How do I refer to this? These are two different results for two difference independent variables.
If you're doing a single comparison like this, you should use a Student's t test. In this case it will show the difference of means is not significant.

BBB
 
  • #4
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PatrickPowers, I was looking for something similar to you answer 'the 72 probably has a higher power transfer ratio but considerable doubt remains'.
I also found on the internet something like 'the absolute uncertainty is less than the difference in uncertainty hence it cannot be fully reliable'. I was looking for an answer like that however I still am not sure if that is right. There is no need to make any graph, I am just looking for a way to describe it when the uncertainty is larger than the difference.
 

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