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Understanding black holes

  1. Apr 7, 2005 #1

    wolram

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    That is the question real, how well do we understand the properties
    of BHs, AFAIK observations are based on the effect they have on there
    surroundings, and no one has actually observed an event horizon.
    Given that something creates massive disturbances in the center of
    galaxies, has everything other than BHs been ruled out?
    and is the loss of information an bothersome part of BH theory?
     
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  3. Apr 7, 2005 #2

    SpaceTiger

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    Everything else that can be predicted by standard physical theory has been ruled out, as far as I know. If black holes don't exist, it's likely because a modification to GR is required in the strong field limit.
     
  4. Apr 7, 2005 #3

    wolram

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    BY Space Tiger
    Everything else that can be predicted by standard physical theory has been ruled out, as far as I know. If black holes don't exist, it's likely because a modification to GR is required in the strong field limit.

    So even though we have observational evidence of some high energy
    events in the center of galaxies, it is possible that they are not caused
    by BHs if GR is in error?
     
  5. Apr 7, 2005 #4

    SpaceTiger

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    That's right. I'm sure many of my colleagues would tell you that black holes are all but proven to exist, but I still share a bit of Einstein's skepticism on the validity of his theory in that regime. Nonetheless, something interesting is going on in those regions and my guess is that it can at least be approximated by a black hole at reasonable distances. I would be more willing to trust the black hole idea once we have more rigorous tests of GR in the strong field limit.
     
  6. Apr 7, 2005 #5

    wolram

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    By Space tiger
    That's right. I'm sure many of my colleagues would tell you that black holes are all but proven to exist, but I still share a bit of Einstein's skepticism on the validity of his theory in that regime. Nonetheless, something interesting is going on in those regions and my guess is that it can at least be approximated by a black hole at reasonable distances. I would be more willing to trust the black hole idea once we have more rigorous tests of GR in the strong field limit.

    So would it be beyond the bounds of possibilities that these eruptions are
    caused by magnetic anomalies?
     
  7. Apr 7, 2005 #6

    Chronos

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    No, but roughly as probable as ET landing in your back yard and Elvis jumping out. There is clearly a very large amount of mass centered on the location of suspected black holes.
     
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