Understanding Color Vision: Mixtures & Frequencies

In summary, the visual system responds to different frequencies of light. RGB values are based on how light is perceived by the human eye.
  • #1
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I'm not sure if this is the right forum for it, but I had a few questions about how color vision works. I know that mixtures of pure colors look like other pure colors. For example, some mixture of pure (monochromatic) green and blue looks like pure yellow. So for a given color, are there an infinite number of different mixtures of colors that look the same? How would you go about finding the frequency of a color that a given mixture of colors corresponds to? And how about converting a frequency to an RGB value?
 
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  • #2
are you asking how the visual system responds to different colour frequencies or how
these colours are made up in teh physics sense?
 
  • #3
I'm saying, given a certain mixture of photons of different wavelengths that are hitting your eye (eg, 30% at 500nm, 45% at 600nm, and 25% at 700nm), what is the wavelength of monochromatic light that would look the same? Or is there not always one? And how do you convert wavelength to RGB values?
 
  • #4
again: so your asking how does the visual system interprets light then? because converting from light to RGB values is a cathode rays thing)
 
  • #5
I don't see what your confusion is. For example, if I wanted to see 500 nm light on my computer screen, what would I set as RGB values in, say, MS Paint.
 
  • #6
my confusion is are you asking the Neuropsychology Method OR the mechanical Method

What the actual Eye sees and how MSPaint/CRTs make color are different.
 
  • #7
I just want to know how mixtures of light look to the human eye. I don't understand how else you could take my original question. For example, you might say something like:

Light made of 75% 500 nm and 25% 600nm, according to this formula ... would look the same as 518nm light.
 
  • #8
Because the visual system may not be as simple as "formula" as 500nm = 501nm...the visual system is more complicated then CRT tubes...go pick up a standard neuropsychology book look up the section on teh visual system: see how the cones detect color(3 types) then proceed to V1 to V3 OR V4...look up the concepts of Constancy & Intensity.
 

1. What is color vision and how does it work?

Color vision is the ability of the human eye to perceive different wavelengths of light and interpret them as different colors. This is made possible by specialized cells in the retina called cones, which are sensitive to red, green, and blue light. The brain then combines these signals to create the full spectrum of colors that we can see.

2. What are the primary colors of light?

The primary colors of light are red, green, and blue. These are the colors that can be combined in different proportions to create all other colors visible to the human eye. This is known as the additive color mixing model.

3. How does color mixing work?

Color mixing occurs when two or more colors are combined to create a new color. This can happen with light, as in the case of additive color mixing, or with pigments, as in the case of subtractive color mixing. When colors are mixed, their wavelengths of light are combined, resulting in a new color.

4. What is the difference between additive and subtractive color mixing?

Additive color mixing involves combining colored light to create new colors, while subtractive color mixing involves combining pigments or dyes to create new colors. In additive mixing, the more colors are combined, the closer the resulting color will be to white. In subtractive mixing, the more colors are combined, the closer the resulting color will be to black.

5. How do frequencies affect color perception?

The frequency of light waves corresponds to the color that we perceive. Red light has a longer wavelength and lower frequency, while blue light has a shorter wavelength and higher frequency. The frequency of light also affects how we perceive the brightness of a color, with higher frequencies appearing brighter than lower frequencies.

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