Understanding Proportional Counter Circuit

In summary, the conversation revolved around a graduate student's project on creating a system for a simple gas filled proportional counter. The main concern was how to connect multiple counters to a single preamp in a correct and cost-effective manner. Possible solutions were discussed, including using a voltage divider circuit, a single preamp with a differential amplifier, a circuit with two preamps, and an operational amplifier circuit. The student expressed openness to feedback and mentioned using LTspice to generate and test input and output signals.
  • #1
KillMartin
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TL;DR Summary
In study and developing a proportional counter, I ran into the problem of how should I connect multiple counters to one single preamplifier correctly (and cheaply).
Hi, I am a graduate student currently studying on the topic of simple gas filled proportional counter. In the effort of trying to make my own system, I ran into this problem that how should I connect multiple counters to one single preamp correctly (and cheaply).

This is the circuit I'm working on right now for a single proportional counter. The schematic is produced with LTspice. Where the tag "Out" would be the input for the charge sensitive preamp that is not shown.
1639001962189.png

I came up with these following possible circuits as a complete electronics novice shooting in the dark.
1639002214167.png

1639002422311.png


Any comment would be greatly appreciated as I am trying to learn. I am currently reading on how to use LTspice to generate the input signal I want so I could play around and test to see the output signal.
 
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  • #2
1. A voltage divider circuit where the two counters are connected in series and the output of one is fed to the input of the other.2. A single preamp with a differential amplifier configuration that takes the outputs of the two counters.3. A circuit with two preamps, one for each counter, and the outputs of the preamps are fed to the differential amplifier.4. An operational amplifier circuit with two inputs, one for each counter, and the output of the op-amp is fed to the charge sensitive preamp.I believe these four circuits should all work but I am sure there could be better ways to do it.Thanks in advance for any advice or comments!
 

Related to Understanding Proportional Counter Circuit

1. What is a proportional counter circuit?

A proportional counter circuit is a type of electronic circuit used in particle detectors to measure the energy and intensity of ionizing radiation. It consists of a gas-filled chamber with a central anode wire and an outer cathode. When ionizing radiation passes through the chamber, it ionizes the gas atoms, creating a proportional amount of free electrons. These electrons are then collected at the anode wire, creating a measurable electrical pulse.

2. How does a proportional counter circuit work?

A proportional counter circuit works by using the principles of gas amplification and gas multiplication. When ionizing radiation enters the gas-filled chamber, it produces a primary ionization event, creating free electrons. These electrons then undergo a series of collisions with gas atoms, producing secondary electrons. This process continues, resulting in a cascade of electrons that are collected at the anode wire, creating a measurable electrical pulse.

3. What are the advantages of using a proportional counter circuit?

Proportional counter circuits have several advantages, including high sensitivity, good energy resolution, and a wide dynamic range. They are also relatively simple and inexpensive compared to other types of particle detectors. Additionally, they can be used to detect a wide range of ionizing radiation, including alpha, beta, and gamma particles.

4. What are the limitations of a proportional counter circuit?

One limitation of a proportional counter circuit is that it can only measure the energy and intensity of ionizing radiation within a certain range. If the radiation is too weak, it may not produce enough ionization to create a measurable pulse. Additionally, the gas used in the chamber can become saturated at high radiation levels, limiting the accuracy of the measurements.

5. How is a proportional counter circuit calibrated?

A proportional counter circuit can be calibrated by exposing it to a known source of radiation and measuring the resulting electrical pulses. The calibration process involves determining the relationship between the energy of the radiation and the amplitude of the pulses. This calibration curve can then be used to convert future pulse measurements into energy values.

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