Understanding the Atomic World: Model vs. Evidence in Modern Science

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In summary, the conversation discusses the existence of the atomic world and the particles that make it up, specifically electrons, neutrons, and protons. The question is raised whether these particles were observed or presupposed, and the use of electron microscopes and bubble chambers to detect and illustrate their existence is mentioned. An image from particleadventure.org is provided as an example of the visualization of these particles.
  • #1
mitch bass
Can someone please help me to understand if what modern science knows about the atomic world is a mathematical model that has validity due to its accuracy in prediction or if modern science has been able to find more concrete evidence and if so, what that evidence might be which allows for example a person to know that there is a particle called an electron and and neutron and a proton.

When the atomic world was first declared to exist in terms of particles consisting of electrons and neutrons and protons, was their actual observation of these particles or were these particles presupposed due to the activity that occurs on a larger than atomic scale which the periodic table and what it suggests does well to make sense of.

An electron microscope can be used to see the microscopic, but has anyone actually seen an electron?
 
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  • #2
Have you even seen a bubble chamber at work? some museums have them, and they show how small tracks are formed every couple seconds or so. They make a very clear illustration of the existence of many particle types.

Here'e an image from particleadventure.org:
http://particleadventure.org/particleadventure/frameless/images/e-p0.jpg

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Edit:
Here's another one, from the same site (which is a great one for you to read about particle detection, behavior and theory):
http://particleadventure.org/particleadventure/frameless/images/bubble.gif
 
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1. What is the atomic model and how is it used in modern science?

The atomic model is a scientific representation of the structure of an atom. It is used to explain the behavior and interactions of atoms, which are the basic building blocks of matter. The model is constantly evolving as new evidence and technology emerge, allowing scientists to better understand the atomic world.

2. How does the atomic model differ from other scientific models?

The atomic model differs from other scientific models in that it is based on evidence from experiments and observations, rather than just theoretical concepts. It also takes into account the probabilistic nature of the atomic world, rather than providing a definite explanation for every phenomenon.

3. What evidence supports the current atomic model?

The current atomic model is supported by a variety of evidence, including experiments such as the gold foil experiment by Ernest Rutherford, the discovery of subatomic particles like protons, neutrons, and electrons, and the development of technologies like particle accelerators and electron microscopes.

4. Why is it important for scientists to understand the limitations of the atomic model?

Understanding the limitations of the atomic model is crucial for scientists because it allows them to critically evaluate the model and make improvements based on new evidence. It also helps prevent misconceptions and misunderstandings about the atomic world, which can lead to incorrect conclusions and hinder scientific progress.

5. How does the atomic model impact our daily lives?

The atomic model has had a huge impact on our daily lives. It has helped us understand the properties and behavior of materials, leading to advancements in technology such as computers, smartphones, and medical equipment. It also plays a crucial role in fields such as chemistry, physics, and materials science, which have practical applications in various industries.

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