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Uniformly accelerated motion

  1. newton

    7 vote(s)
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  2. eintstein

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  1. Aug 31, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A human throws a rock off of a bridge that is 30 meters above the water. It takes 3 seconds from the time the human throws the rock up in the air and falls all the way back down to the water. What is the initial velocity of the rock leaving the persons hand?


    2. Relevant equations

    i have know idea

    3. The attempt at a solution

    idk. my physics teacher gave me this problem today at school cause he believes me to be one of his better students. he told me to come home and attempt it because he found this problem in an old physics book today and could not figure it out. please help if possible
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 1, 2009
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 31, 2009 #2

    rl.bhat

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    Here the displacement of the rock is 30 m.
    The displacement and acceleration due to gravity are in the same direction but the velocity is in the opposite direction.
    Use the kinematic equation h = -vo*t + 1/2*g*t^2 and find velocity.
     
  4. Sep 1, 2009 #3

    Redbelly98

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    Welcome to PF dantheman3199.

    Please, in the future, make some attempt, no matter how small, at solving a problem before seeking help.

    As you're aware, this is a problem in uniformly accelerated motion. That automatically implies several equations that could be relevant :smile:

    p.s. Calculus was developed about 200 years before Einstein was born.
     
  5. Sep 1, 2009 #4
    well i had no idea how to attempt it. i tried for like an hour on scratch paper then found this. so if you know how to do the problem then be my guest
     
  6. Sep 1, 2009 #5
    hey rl.bhat if you could help me out with solving this it would be good. i dont have enough experience in physics to know what h would be?
     
  7. Sep 1, 2009 #6

    Hootenanny

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    rl.bhat is helping you, but he isn't going to do your homework for you.

    What level of education are you at?
     
  8. Sep 1, 2009 #7
    Im in twelvth grade in high school and i have only been taking physics for 3 weeks. and i guess i put this problem in the wrong folder cause its not homework. my teacher couldnt figure out how to do it so he asked me to try
     
  9. Sep 1, 2009 #8

    Hootenanny

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    You're in twelfth grade and you have only just started studying Physics? So, you're 18 years old and have never studied Physics until three weeks ago?

    And I'm sorry, but I don't believe that your 12th grade Physics teacher cannot solve this problem. Furthermore, even if your teacher couldn't solve this problem, I don't think that they would give it to one of their students to solve.
     
  10. Sep 1, 2009 #9
    ok no << profane insult removed by berkeman >>im 17. and clearly it doesnt matter if you dont believe me. dont write **** down on my thread if your not gonna help out.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 1, 2009
  11. Sep 1, 2009 #10

    Hootenanny

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    Question: what made you choose this specific title for this thread?
     
  12. Sep 1, 2009 #11
  13. Sep 1, 2009 #12
    is the intial velocity on my problem 4.7 m/sec?
    that is what i ended up getting
     
  14. Sep 1, 2009 #13

    Hootenanny

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    Why did you choose the title "Uniformaly accelerated motion"?
     
  15. Sep 1, 2009 #14

    berkeman

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    Insults are not allowed here.

    We will not solve your schoolwork problem for you here. You must do it yourself. We can give you hints (as has already been done in this thread), but you must do your schoolwork for yourself.

    As already mentioned, you should use the kinematic equations of motion for a constant acceleration field (like gravity). Here is some further reading that you can do to help you figure out how to solve this class of problems:

    http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/Class/1DKin/U1L6a.html [Broken]

    .
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  16. Sep 1, 2009 #15
    ok thanks berkeman. i got 4.7m/sec as intial velocity. could you confirm that?
     
  17. Sep 1, 2009 #16

    berkeman

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    I'd be happy to. Could you please show the equation that you used, and show the numbers plugged in? Thanks.
     
  18. Sep 1, 2009 #17
    h = -vo*t + 1/2*g*t^2


    and i plugged 30 meters in for h. plugged 9.8m/sec^2 for g. and 3 seconds for time
     
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