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Units of electric field

  1. Sep 17, 2008 #1
    A possible set of units of electric field, E, in terms of base units is:

    a) kg x m x s^-1 x C^-2
    b) kg x m^2 x s^-2 x C^-1
    c) kg x m x s^-2 x C^-1
    d) C x s^-1
    e) N x C^-1

    I believe it is E but i wondering if there is somthing I am missing. This is how I came up with that answer

    E = kq/r^2

    E = Nm^2/C^2 x C / m^2
    = Nm^2 x C / C^2 x m^2

    It says to use base units so for Newton am i suppose to incorporate a kg? I know that the unit for E is N/C but this problem just seems like it would be too easy if that was the answer
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 18, 2008 #2


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    Homework Helper

    Hi Kathi201,

    Right; your answer of E is correct but I believe there is another correct answer. Think about what a Newton is in terms of other units.
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