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Units question

  1. Aug 11, 2007 #1
    If a coulumb is defined as the amount of charge carried by a current of one Ampere in a second, why is its units Amperes seconds and not Amperes per seconds?
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 11, 2007 #2

    mjsd

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    [tex]I=\frac{dQ}{dt}[/tex] by definition and so [tex]Q = \int I\;dt[/tex] which has a unit of (amperes x seconds)
    seems obvious to me, do I understand your question correctly?
     
  4. Aug 11, 2007 #3
    Yes, I see how it works mathematically. But I just thought "the amount of charge carried by a current of one Ampere in a second" was similar to the amount of charge carried by a current of one Ampere per second" so it would have units of Amperes/S
     
  5. Aug 11, 2007 #4

    mgb_phys

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    No because a coulomb is a total amount of charge not a rate, so after 2 seconds you have 2 coulombs.
     
  6. Aug 12, 2007 #5

    mjsd

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    yeah, another example Energy = Power x time
    and Energy is not a rate, while Power is. so amount of charge is like "energy" in this analogy
     
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