Univ Physics Courses: EE Major Feedback Requested

In summary, the conversation focused on a student's first year physics courses at university, specifically PCS 125 Physics I, PCS 211 Physics II - Mechanics, and PCS 224 Solid State Physics. The student was wondering about the courses and the group discussed the order and content of the courses. They also mentioned the usual order for introductory physics courses and how it differs from this set. Some schools keep fields and waves separate, but these courses seem to cover it all. It was noted that the first course includes quantization of radiation, which is usually found in modern physics courses. The group also discussed the numbering of the courses and the possibility of taking a graduate level solid state course.
  • #1
nikola-tesla
44
0
hey all, these are going to be my first year physics courses at univ. i was just wondering what you all thought of them! I am majoring in EE and not the greatest fan of physics but these 3 courses are mandatory and i understand why, i was just looking for you input! thanks a bunch. :smile:

PCS 125 Physics I

Forces, fields and potentials for gravitational, electrical and magnetic systems. Oscillations, sound, electromagnetic waves. Geometric and wave optics. Quantization of radiation. (formerly PCS 123).
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Lect: 3 hrs./Lab: 1 hr.


PCS 211 Physics II - Mechanics

Newton’s laws, reaction forces, free body diagrams, friction, equilibrium of rigid bodies, torque, centre of gravity, linear and rotational kinematics and dynamics, conservation of linear and angular momentum and energy, moment of inertia, work and power, collisions.
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Lect: 4 hrs./Lab: 1 hr.
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PCS 224 Solid State Physics

Quantum mechanics and quantum nature of solids, properties of materials. Band theory in metals and semiconductors. Conduction processes, the p-n junction, transistors and other solid state devices.
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Lect: 3 hrs./Lab: 1 hr.
 
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  • #2
Looks pretty much like the introductory 3 course set, except the order might be a little backwards: the usual order is Mechanics, then E&M and finally Wave Phenomena, or some variation of that. Looks like you are basically covering it all though.

~Lyuokdea
 
  • #3
well, since the classes are...mandatory, looks like it doesn't matter what we think! :tongue:

kinda strange how they numbered their two intro courses: usually Newtonian mechanics is the first physics course!

also looks like they crammed in fields and waves in the same course--some but not all schools keep them separate. (university of florida has two intro courses, Newtonian mech and electricity and magnetism/optics.)

a bit strange how your first course has quantization of radiation in there, but i guess it makes sense to make a transition into a modern physics course.

and are there any prereqs for that solid state course?

i'm jealous--our intro to solid state class is 5000 (grad) level -- (although i plan on taking it anyway if it's offered during the right semester... :devil: )
 

1. What is the purpose of taking university physics courses as an electrical engineering major?

University physics courses are essential for electrical engineering majors because they provide a foundation in fundamental scientific principles such as mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, and optics. These courses also teach problem-solving skills and critical thinking, which are crucial for success in the field of electrical engineering.

2. Are the physics courses offered at universities suitable for electrical engineering majors?

Yes, the physics courses offered at universities are specifically designed to meet the needs of electrical engineering majors. They cover topics that are relevant to the field and are taught by experts in the subject matter. Additionally, these courses often include hands-on laboratory experiences that allow students to apply the concepts they learn in class.

3. What are some common challenges that electrical engineering majors face in university physics courses?

Some common challenges that electrical engineering majors may face in university physics courses include the abstract nature of the subject, the heavy use of mathematical concepts, and the fast pace of the course. It is important for students to stay organized, ask questions, and seek help when needed to overcome these challenges.

4. How can electrical engineering majors prepare for university physics courses?

To prepare for university physics courses, electrical engineering majors can review basic mathematical and scientific concepts, such as algebra, trigonometry, and Newton's laws of motion. They can also practice problem-solving by completing practice exercises and seeking out online resources. Additionally, reviewing the course syllabus and familiarizing oneself with the required textbooks can also be helpful.

5. Can I provide feedback on the university physics courses as an electrical engineering major?

Yes, as an electrical engineering major, you can provide feedback on the university physics courses you take. Your feedback is valuable and can help improve the course for future students. You can provide feedback through course evaluations, surveys, or by directly speaking with your professor or department. Your input is greatly appreciated and can contribute to a better learning experience for all students.

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