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Universe is a white hole?

  1. Aug 18, 2005 #1

    wolram

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    http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0508367

    Authors: John G. Hartnett
    Comments: 7 pages, 6 figures

    The distance modulus and supernova redshift data, determined by the high-z type Ia supernovae teams, is found to describe a model of the universe that places the Galaxy at the center in a spherically symmetric isotropic gravitational field. The result describes particles moving in both a central potential and an accelerating universe without the need for the inclusion of dark matter. However the sign for the only possible solution, consistent with the observed data, implies a finite bounded white hole. A comparison with the model that ignores the central potential indicates that this model is much more robust and the averaged matter density of the universe $\Omega_{m}$ derived from the analysis is highly significant. From two measured data sets it is determined that the matter density $\Omega_{m} \approx 0.0304$ and the vacuum energy contribution to gravity $\Omega_{\Lambda} \approx 0.9688$, with a total $\Omega_{\Lambda}+ \Omega_{m} \approx 1$ at the present epoch. From the model also an estimate of the effective radius of the universe $R_{*} = 0.67 c\tau$ is derived as well as the Hubble constant in the limit of zero gravity $h = 72.88 \pm 1.30$ km/s/Mpc.
     
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  3. Aug 18, 2005 #2

    SpaceTiger

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    Aside from the absurdity of putting us at the center of the universe, this paper hasn't even found a solution for their universe's evolution with time. Perhaps I'm missing it, but I also don't see an explanation for the CMB within their model.
     
  4. Aug 18, 2005 #3

    wolram

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    I do not defend the paper in any way, but would a white hole require a CMB?
     
  5. Aug 18, 2005 #4

    pervect

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    This is sort of a sidenote:

    "White hole" solutions for cosmology exist, but are of little practical interest because they are not isotropic. You can construct a model that has a standard FRW cosmology "inside" some radius, glued to an external Schwarzschild solution. See for instance

    Is the universe a black hole?

     
  6. Aug 18, 2005 #5

    SpaceTiger

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    The CMB is observed. The question is whether a white hole will produce a CMB, no whether it requires it.
     
  7. Aug 18, 2005 #6
    HINT: black holes are by definition VERY large natural quantum computers operating at the Bekenstein Bound- and they perform more Flops than the observable universe has since the big bang

    the universe can be a white hole yet isotropic and centerless/boundless yet flat and finite if it's metric is 'VIRTUAL'-

    the universe is not a play with objects dancing in a Cartesian Theatre background- Reality emerges from relationships and systems of interactions [ie software]
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2005
  8. Aug 18, 2005 #7

    Chronos

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    I doubt the patient will survive the dosage required for this dark matter cure.
     
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