Unmovable object and an unstoppable object

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In summary: H. ArlenIn summary, the conversation discusses the theoretical scenario of two objects, one being an immovable object and the other being an unstoppable object, colliding in space at the speed of light and the potential creation of a "black hole." However, the concepts of an immovable and an unstoppable object are mutually exclusive and cannot coexist. The possibility of the two objects creating a high energy force or a "local big bang" is also mentioned. The conversation ends with a reference to the song "Something's Gotta Give" and the idea that the two objects may have more in common than initially thought.
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z4955
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Theoretically speaking, if out in space, you have two objects, one being an immoveable object, and the other being an unstoppable object traveling at the speed of light, and neither being able to be destroyed or forced off course in any form or fashion, what would happen if said two objects should collide? Is it possible that these two forces would create a separate energy force such as a 'black hole'?
 
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  • #2
an unmovable object and an unstoppable object can't possibly coexist...
 
  • #3
Both concepts are mutually exclusive, impossible.
 
  • #4
nothing is impossible until proven otherwise and the question still remains.
 
  • #5
back in the 1930's and 1940's there was a thinktank that was thrown together of many different scientists extracted from many different countries with the theory of the splitting of an atom. It was said that it was unable to be done... it was impossible. Thus, we have the hydrogen and the atom bomb... the splitting of atoms. Therefore, it was an impossibility waiting to be proven.
 
  • #6
it is possible(that is to say that the immovable object will cause the unstoppable object to change directions)...the collision would create a high energetic environment around it...perhaps a "local big bang". I doubt that it could create a black hole(which sucks up things) because its squeezing the space between them pushing everything around it
 
  • #7
I would think that, after a great deal of noise, they would find they had more in common than not, and they would start dating.

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The Rev
 
  • #8
z4955 said:
back in the 1930's and 1940's there was a thinktank that was thrown together of many different scientists extracted from many different countries with the theory of the splitting of an atom. It was said that it was unable to be done... it was impossible. Thus, we have the hydrogen and the atom bomb... the splitting of atoms. Therefore, it was an impossibility waiting to be proven.

Totally different animal. What you are talking about is the old chestnut of an inmovable object meeting an irresistable force. In this case we are dealing with mutually exclusive properties. By definition an inmovable object is one that cannot be moved by any existing force. By definition an irresistable force is a force that can move any existing object. Thus in any reality in which one exists, the existence of the other is automatically excluded. They can not meet because by definition they can not co-exist.
 
  • #9
When an irresistible force such as you
Meets an old immovable object like me
You can bet as sure as you live
Somewhere, sometime, somehow
Something's got to give


- J. Mercer
 

1. What is the concept of an unmovable object and an unstoppable object?

The concept refers to a hypothetical scenario in which there is an object that cannot be moved or stopped by any force or object, and another object that is able to move or stop any other object. This scenario is often used in philosophical discussions about the limits of physics and the laws of nature.

2. Is it possible for an unmovable object and an unstoppable object to exist in reality?

No, this scenario is purely hypothetical and not possible in reality. The laws of physics dictate that all objects have mass and therefore can be moved or stopped by other forces or objects, even if it requires an immense amount of energy.

3. How does this concept relate to the laws of physics?

The concept of an unmovable object and an unstoppable object challenges the fundamental laws of physics, including Newton's laws of motion and the conservation of energy. It raises questions about the limits of these laws and whether there are any exceptions.

4. Can this concept be resolved by scientific theories or experiments?

No, the concept is purely theoretical and cannot be resolved through scientific theories or experiments. It is a philosophical thought experiment that explores the boundaries of our understanding of the laws of nature.

5. Why is the concept of an unmovable object and an unstoppable object important in science?

The concept challenges our understanding of the fundamental laws of physics and encourages critical thinking about the limits of our knowledge. It also highlights the importance of theoretical concepts and thought experiments in scientific exploration and discovery.

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