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Up to date medieval poetry-some funny!

  1. Oct 6, 2005 #1

    marcus

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    Up to date medieval poetry---some funny!

    Have a look at the translations of medieval/renaissance poetry
    into modern English

    http://www.brindin.com/main.htm

    this is the web's best verse translation website AFAIK

    like look at what Brindin has in Provençal-----the troubadour language.
    especially William of Aquitaine from around 1100 or so

    The way you get it is at the homepage (the old books saying "french", "german", "italian", "other" you click on OTHER

    http://www.brindin.com/pwpoth.htm

    and you get a list of dozens of languages and you click PROVENÇAL

    http://www.brindin.com/pwpoth.htm#provencal

    and with any luck you see some by William IX of Aquitaine (a rowdy good time medieval charlie whose granddaughter was the famous Eleanor of Aquitaine, mother of Richard Lionhearted etc.)

    of course there's Dante and Petrarch and Rilke and Angiolieri and Vogelweide and Cavalcanti ... too.
    Tell me if you can find any great European poet from 1100-1900 which Brindin has left out! If I agree I will attempt to remedy the lack.
     
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  3. Oct 7, 2005 #2

    honestrosewater

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    Sweet! :smile: Little side question: I'm collecting references to willows in literature and found some new ones on that site. (Thank you!) Do you have any idea where I could find others? I think I have English literature covered, but I don't have many resources for other languages.
     
  4. Oct 8, 2005 #3

    marcus

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    Rosewater, I do not say these are good poems. I simply looked for foreignlanguage poems about willow-trees---something that is easy for me to help with. (willow is die Weide (Ger.) le saule (Fr.) el sauce (Sp.))

    did you get the willow poem of
    Christian MORGENSTERN?
    http://www.garten-literatur.de/Leselaube/morgenstern_palmsonntag.htm

    http://ingeb.org/Lieder/katzchen.html

    Here is another German one, by RILKE
    http://www.sandammeer.at/animalisches/rilke-weide.htm

    a French one of Raymond RADIGUET (1903-1923)
    http://poesie.webnet.fr/poemes/France/radiguet/18.html

    a German one by someone I don't know at all: Georg BRITTING
    http://www.britting.com/gedichte/2-033.html

    Here is a Spanish one by César VALLEJO
    http://palabravirtual.com/index.php?ir=ver_poema1.php&pid=6402
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2005
  5. Oct 8, 2005 #4

    honestrosewater

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    Wow, thanks. :biggrin: Don't worry, I'm not interested in the artistry of the poem, only the meaning of the willow in it.
     
  6. Oct 8, 2005 #5

    Evo

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    Marcus, what a great find, thanks for sharing!!! I will soon have enough online reading to keep me occupied this winter. :approve:
     
  7. Oct 8, 2005 #6

    marcus

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    So glad you showed up! I am pleased that you like the Brindin Press site.
    Please, as you read brindin.com and come across poems or translations that you especially like, list them here. We can use this thread as a community BOOKMARKS for that site. Because if it has any problem it is that there are a great many translations. One has to sift to find one's favorites.

    Everybody is invited in on this hunt/gather expedition.

    Evo, and also those who have registered their guesses in the two POLLS----selfAdjoint, arildno, Andre, loseyourname, smurf,...-----I have question which is when shall we close the poll and say what the actual timeperiod was?

    the fact is in the case of the Italian sonnet, Andre and (I think subsequently) arildno have already guessed who the poet was. So shouldnt we just put the answer plainly on that thread? and say plainly who guessed right? that would effectively close the thread to further guesses, although it could be left open in case people want to comment.

    Or should we leave it with no answer for people to continue guessing, who just happen onto by accident or to find as you did, Evo?
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2005
  8. Oct 8, 2005 #7

    Evo

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    It's up to you. I would say if a day or two goes by with no more guesses, you could post the answer.

    You'll find some people will continue to guess the answer even after it's posted. :smile:
     
  9. Oct 8, 2005 #8

    marcus

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    If it is up to me, I will proceed forthwith to congratulate the winning guessers! Same day poll basically.

    I think Andre and selfAdjoint did rather well
     
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