Upward force on each anchorage

In summary: The pipe is anchored every 3 m. Draw a picture and think about the effective length of the pipe that each anchor must hold down.In summary, the steel pipeline has a diameter of 120 cm and an external diameter of 125 cm. It is completely submerged in water and anchored at intervals of 3 m along its length. The buoyancy force per meter run is (approximately) 1.204 x 104 N/m.
  • #1
ZeroFive
2
0

Homework Statement



A steel pipeline carrying gas has an internal diameter of 120 cm and an external diameter of 125 cm. It is laid across the bed of a river, completely immersed in water and is anchored at intervals of 3 m along its length.

  1. Calculate the buoyancy force per meter run.
  2. Upward force on each anchorage.

Density of steel = 7900 kg/m3.

2. Equations used

Buoyancy Force = Weight of the displaced fluid volume

The Attempt at a Solution



I calculated that the buoyancy per unit length is (approximately), 1.204 x 104 N/m
But I don't see a way to find the answer to the second question. Can someone lead me in the right direction or show me how it's done?
 
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  • #2
Welcome to PF!
ZeroFive said:
I calculated that the buoyancy per unit length is (approximately), 1.204 x 104 N/m
OK
But I don't see a way to find the answer to the second question. Can someone lead me in the right direction or show me how it's done?
My hint for this part is to think about whether the weight of the pipe is important in answering the second question.
 
  • #3
TSny said:
My hint for this part is to think about whether the weight of the pipe is important in answering the second question.

By finding the weight of a unit length and subtracting that from the answer of part 1 gives the additional downward force per unit length the anchor need to provide for the pipe to be in equilibrium. But don't we need the length of the pipe to determine the number of anchors and the total downward force required?
 
  • #4
ZeroFive said:
By finding the weight of a unit length and subtracting that from the answer of part 1 gives the additional downward force per unit length the anchor need to provide for the pipe to be in equilibrium.
OK
But don't we need the length of the pipe to determine the number of anchors and the total downward force required?
The pipe is anchored every 3 m. Draw a picture and think about the effective length of the pipe that each anchor must hold down.
 

Related to Upward force on each anchorage

1. What is upward force on each anchorage?

Upward force on each anchorage refers to the force that is exerted on each end of a cable or rope that is pulling upwards. This force acts in the opposite direction of the weight of the object being lifted.

2. How is upward force on each anchorage calculated?

The upward force on each anchorage can be calculated by using the formula F = mg, where F is the upward force, m is the mass of the object, and g is the acceleration due to gravity.

3. What factors affect the upward force on each anchorage?

The upward force on each anchorage is affected by the weight of the object being lifted, the angle of the cable or rope, and the strength and stability of the anchorage points.

4. Why is upward force on each anchorage important?

Understanding the upward force on each anchorage is important in designing and constructing structures that use cables or ropes for support, such as suspension bridges and cranes. It also helps to ensure the safety and stability of these structures.

5. How can the upward force on each anchorage be increased?

The upward force on each anchorage can be increased by increasing the weight of the object being lifted, decreasing the angle of the cable or rope, or using stronger and more secure anchorage points. However, it is important to consider the limitations and safety factors of the structure when increasing the upward force on each anchorage.

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