Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

US 'cell assault' video released

  1. Mar 1, 2009 #1

    cristo

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/7917295.stm

    This video is just amazing. Police officers are supposed to be showing an example to the rest of society, and not abusing their power. This guy should be locked up!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 1, 2009 #2
    I don't think that is torture (other most common thing which should discouraged IMO). He just acted out of anger because the girl seems to have acted like a real a******. I bet she been swearing a lot before they brought her to the cell.
    Now, I don't think policemen are given anger management training or they need it.
     
  4. Mar 1, 2009 #3

    cristo

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    Of course it's not torture, but it is assault.

    Anger? That is a lot more than anger. Regardless, if a police officer cannot control his anger, then he shouldn't be in the job. Anyway, how do you know she'd been acting like a 'real a******'? All I see is a teenager kick her shoes off at him: how do you know she wasn't told to given him her shoes? Does any of this alleged 'attitude' condone him kicking her in the stomach, punching her in the face, smashing her against the wall, then throwing her to the ground by her hair, before pinning her arms behind her back and punching her in the head twice?
     
  5. Mar 1, 2009 #4

    Kurdt

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    If they are lace up shoes she would have probably been asked to remove them in case she attempted to comit suicide with the laces. Its standard practise (at least in the UK). The officers reaction to the way she nonchalantly kicked her shoes off towards him was outrageous. Even if she was swearing and being abusive then there is still no excuse for that reaction toward a 15 year old girl.
     
  6. Mar 1, 2009 #5

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    That is insane. I don't care if she "assaulted" the officer earlier as his lawyers claim, what he did is inexcusible.

    In the US "Sheriffs" are elected. They aren't police officers. I don't know how much training they get, and it would certainly vary from town to town.
     
  7. Mar 1, 2009 #6

    dlgoff

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    What's the deal? With Firefox 3, when I play the clip I get a Price Line ad.
     
  8. Mar 1, 2009 #7
    You mean this video surprised you? From my point of view, ignorant and abusive policeman are by far the most common kind. I always thought that the goal with hiring police officers from the same pool of low lifes who commit these crude crimes was to legitimize their behavior in a certain domain, so that the total number of criminals would appear to be lower.
     
  9. Mar 1, 2009 #8

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    We will not tolerate this kind of posting of unsubstantiated personal opinion that is insulting to a group of people.
     
  10. Mar 1, 2009 #9

    It would have completely inexcusable if officer intentionally assaulted her (then no one else but him is to blame).

    But here, did he knew what he was doing? Or, did he have good training? If he never learned in his training how to deal with his anger/temper, then some of the blame goes to the body that provides the training. So, punishing/blaming him alone would not solve this problem in the future.


    1. I don't know the whole story and that news looks bit biased to me.
    2. Personally, I was under impression that police act bit more aggressive. Kicking or hitting twice might be common in those places.
     
  11. Mar 1, 2009 #10

    mgb_phys

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    It certainly is - the tapes are normally faulty when it comes to this sort of thing.
    It's like how CCTV cameras are never available when there is a demonstatration.

    Anybody stupid enough to do this in view of a camera should probably have his night stick confiscated before he does himself an injury - and probably needs professional care.
     
  12. Mar 1, 2009 #11
    What could the trainee have done to protect the girl? He seemed concerned, but did his trainer's authority take over?

    Would the video have received as much acclaim if the girl were black? No kidding.
     
  13. Mar 1, 2009 #12

    cristo

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    Did he know what he was doing? If not, then he's clearly not mentally capable of being a police officer.

    You can't make a CCTV video biased (unless you edit it, which this one doesn't appear to be).

    To restrain a dangerous criminal on the streets maybe, but a 15 year old girl who is already in a police cell and is 3 foot away from the police officer that she's half the size of is not, in my opinion, dangerous.
     
  14. Mar 1, 2009 #13

    siddharth

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Saw this and was disgusted.

    Placed??!! :mad:

    http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/401779_schene28.html
     
  15. Mar 1, 2009 #14

    mgb_phys

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Unless she had a stapler - then 4 of them could have reasonably feared for their lives.
    (you might need to be in Vancouver to get this)
     
  16. Mar 1, 2009 #15

    cristo

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    (I think you do!)
     
  17. Mar 1, 2009 #16

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

  18. Mar 1, 2009 #17
    Please help me guess what on Earth could ever justify what the police officer is doing on this video. Even perpetrators of crime against humanity are not supposed to be treated in this manner. I just can not come to terms with
    because I don't understand how seeing the video can change anything to the facts shown by the video. It does not matter what this girl has done before. Such a policeman must be removed from duty and go the other side of the bars, where he belongs.
     
  19. Mar 1, 2009 #18
    Forgive me if I am wrong, but does he help her stand up by pulling her hair instead of her arm?
     
  20. Mar 1, 2009 #19
    Yes agree that here:
    1) The girl did not posses any harm
    2) The officer's response was not required
    So, that is definitely professional misconduct.

    But, I think it is biased in terms that
    1) It seems to put 100% of blame on the officer which is simple not true.

    It just make their profession complicated. They get lots of negative opinions from the media even when things are out of control and they can't do more than screwing up something.

    He should be punished by law and they should see how to prevent this in future. But, I don't like these things getting public scrutiny (there should be a limit to what level of public scrutiny is appropriate..).
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2009
  21. Mar 2, 2009 #20

    siddharth

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Why is not true, in this instance? The police officer had no justification for his behaviour, irrespective of the behavior of the girl (who was a minor, and did not pose any physical threat). I think this officer deserves 100% of the blame.

    Why is that? I think that it's important to give public scrutiny to such incidents, especially when we consider the powers and responsibilities which is expected of the police. I've seen a worrying number of such incidents of late, and public exposure could raise awareness of certain problems in the system, and might lead to measures to correct it.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: US 'cell assault' video released
  1. Releasing information (Replies: 7)

  2. Release stress (Replies: 16)

Loading...