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Using the Midpoint rule to find the distance traveled

  1. Nov 27, 2011 #1
    I was given a chart with 30 second intervals starting at 0 seconds up to 15 minutes. For each interval there is a number telling you the miles/hour for that interval (car driving).

    I am supposed to approximate the distance traveled using the midpoint rule (Delta t = 1 minute)

    I took the data and turned the left hand column into seconds and the right hand column into feet per second. (Get the numbers in the same units)

    Here they are:

    (secs) (ft/sec)
    0 0
    30 7.33
    60 44
    90 0
    120 14.66
    150 52.8
    180 61.6
    210 48.4
    240 10.26
    270 36.66
    300 44
    330 2.933
    360 44
    390 35.2
    420 22
    450 44
    480 61.6
    510 71.86
    540 60.13
    570 51.33
    600 67.46
    630 70.4
    660 70.4
    690 51.33
    720 61.6
    750 16.13
    780 0
    810 26.4
    840 51.33
    870 70.4
    900 0



    Now for the midpoint rule part what I thought you had to do was this:

    ((900-0)/15)* (All of the midpoint numbers added up (i.e at 30 secs, 90 secs, ect...))

    I thought this was correct because you take the last number 900 minus the first 0 over how many sections you will have (15 because your splitting it up into 1 minute sections) then multiply that by all of the midpoints added up.

    I keep getting a crazy number though..

    Can someone take a look and see what im doing wrong?
     
  2. jcsd
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