1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

V = 12 m/s to v = 7 m/s

  1. Oct 8, 2011 #1
    A 120-V generator is run by a windmill that has blades 2.0 m long. The wind, moving at 12 m/s, is slowed to 7.0 m/s after passing the windmill. The density of air is 1.29 kg/m3. If the system has no losses, what is the largest current the generator can produce?
    (Hint : How much energy does the wind lose per second?)

    Thank you very much...
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 8, 2011 #2

    SammyS

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    What have you tried?

    Where are you stuck?

    We shouldn't try to help until we have seen that you have tried.
     
  4. Oct 8, 2011 #3
    [itex]\Delta \ KE = -\frac{1}{2}.m.(v_2^2-v_1^2)=-\frac{1}{2}.\rho.V.(7^2-12^2)=61.275V[/itex] (V = Volume of air)

    [itex]\frac{\tau}{\epsilon} = \frac{N.B.I.A}{N.B.A. \omega} = \frac{I}{ \omega } \ \rightarrow \ \tau= \frac{\epsilon.I}{\omega}=\frac{P}{\omega}[/itex]

    [itex]\tau=\frac{\Delta KE}{\omega.t} \ = \ \frac{61.275V}{\omega.t}[/itex]

    And I stuck from that point. Here is my problems :
    1. I don't understand what is the use of blades' length
    2. How to find volume of air?
    3. Is it true angular speed not given?
     
  5. Oct 8, 2011 #4

    gneill

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    It could be that they want you to assume that the cross sectional area of the airstream is defined by the span of the blades as they rotate.
     
  6. Oct 9, 2011 #5
    I still can't get the answer.... :(
    Anyway, the book says its answer is 77 Ampere
     
  7. Oct 9, 2011 #6

    gneill

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Start with determining the volumetric rate (m3/s) at which air is passing the windmill cross section. Then turn that into mass rate by multiplying by density. What do you get?
     
  8. Oct 10, 2011 #7
    How to find volumetric rate sir? If I multiply it by density, i wiil get mass rate.....
     
  9. Oct 10, 2011 #8

    gneill

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Volume has units of m3. Cross sectional area has units of m2. Velocity has units of m/s...
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: V = 12 m/s to v = 7 m/s
  1. M/s/s Help (Replies: 7)

  2. M/s or m/s^2 (Replies: 2)

  3. M/s^3 to m/s^2 (Replies: 3)

Loading...