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Vector analysis

  1. Nov 3, 2007 #1
    something for a mathematician that likes physics or a physicist that likes math. rigorous but with pictures and examples and the such?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 3, 2007 #2

    robphy

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  4. Nov 4, 2007 #3
  5. Nov 4, 2007 #4

    robphy

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    I like them both...especially the Bamberg&Sternberg one.
     
  6. Nov 5, 2007 #5
    I would take terrible reviews on Amazon.com with a grain of salt. Many of those reviews are by lazy, underprepared, or unprepared students who are looking to vent their frustrations with a book that they were not willing, ready or able to tackle. If none of those suggestions appeal to you, some standard textbooks for a second course in vector calculus / calculus on manifolds include Spivak, Calculus on Manifolds; Munkres, Analysis on Manifolds; C. H. Edwards, Advanced Calculus of Several Variables; and H. M. Edwards, Advanced Calculus: A Differential Forms Approach. Of those, the last book by H. M. Edwards is probably the closest to what you're looking for. But I would warn you that, since you cannot identify that vector analysis is the same as vector calculus or that it would likely be covered fairly extensively in a math methods book, you may not be adequately prepared to tackle any of these books.
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2007
  7. Nov 5, 2007 #6

    robphy

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    You might like
    http://www1.mengr.tamu.edu/rbowen/ [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 3, 2017
  8. Nov 5, 2007 #7
    Bowen's book posted by robphy is really good, if you're willing to deal with ugly typesetting and some typos. Edwards' book on advanced calculus with differential forms is a current project of mine, so I'll let you know how it goes. A more typical book on vector analysis though,is Marsden & Tromba's Vector Calculus. EDIT: which I just realized has already been posted. Sorry.

    YET ANOTHER EDIT: If you'd like to learn about differential forms, here's a paper on the arXiv which was turned into a book: A Geometric Approach to Differential Forms
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2007
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