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Vector Calculus Help Please

  1. Jan 20, 2005 #1
    I have a problem that I don't even know how to start. Can anyone assist me with the following problem?

    The tension T at the end of each chain has magnitude 25 N and makes an angle of 37 degrees with the horizontal. What is the weight of the chain?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 20, 2005 #2

    dextercioby

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    Is this the text of the problem??It doesn't make too much sense...How many chains are there??In what position are they disposed?Do they hang under their own weight??

    Daniel.
     
  4. Jan 20, 2005 #3
    It's just one chain that appears to be hanging between two buildings. There is nothing besides the weight of the chain pulling it down.
     
  5. Jan 20, 2005 #4

    arildno

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    Welcome to PF!
    Since the chain is at rest, no net external forces can act on the chain (agreed?)
    List the various external forces acting on the chain; their SUM must be zero..
     
  6. Jan 20, 2005 #5
    I get that idea. Unfortunately, this isn't a physics problem. We aren't dealing with any of the forces, etc. The only things we have to work with are the tension and the angles at the end of the chain to figure out the weight of the chain.


    Thanks for the welcome.
     
  7. Jan 20, 2005 #6

    arildno

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    " Unfortunately, this isn't a physics problem. We aren't dealing with any of the forces, etc."?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

    And, what is tension? What is weight?
    These aren't FORCES?
    Is this not PHYSICS?
     
  8. Jan 20, 2005 #7

    dextercioby

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    What are u talking about??
    What?????

    Is my logics wrong,or you just contradicted yourself...

    Post your ideas for this problem...

    Daniel.
     
  9. Jan 20, 2005 #8
    What I mean is that we aren't taking any outside forces into account. One of the responses mentioned that the outside forces had to sum to 0. That was what I was attempting to respond to.

    As for my ideas for the problem, I don't really have any. I think that the book leaves out information I am supposed to know. I don't even know where to start with the problem.

    Sorry to bother you with my problem. I will just have to ask the professor, I guess.
     
  10. Jan 20, 2005 #9
    Is there a way to delete my account? I don't see an option anywhere for that. If someone can tell me how to delete, I will be gone. I hope no one else comes to you with an "easy problem". I feel bad for anyone who does.
     
  11. Jan 20, 2005 #10
    Excuse my mistake. Everything says Physics and MATH help. I even noticed probability questions on here that were answered nicely. I even entitled the thread as vector calculus help...so sorry to waste your time. This just proves my theory that all physicists are jerks!!!
     
  12. Jan 20, 2005 #11

    arildno

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    This is no way of behaving. Neither daniel or myself have said anything to warrant these types of remarks. Frankly, I'm shocked by your rudeness.
    You don't DESERVE any help.

    GOOD RIDDANCE!
     
  13. Jan 20, 2005 #12
    Why on Earth does the thread title have "vector calculus" in it??
     
  14. Jan 22, 2005 #13

    Kane O'Donnell

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    Hey everyone - the problem janedoe75 is referring to seems to make sense on the face of it, so how about we all stop TALKING IN CAPITALS and using LOTS!!!! OF!!!! PUNTUATION!!!! and try and answer the question.

    Wouldn't you just treat the vertical component of the tension as being equal and opposite to the force of gravity acting downwards? Since *weight* is just a force, the weight of the chain is just twice the vertical component of the tension at one end of the chain.

    (let me know if there is something flawed in that argument, please...)

    Cheerio,

    Kane

    (who is probably a jerk, but tries hard not to be... :wink:)
     
  15. Jan 22, 2005 #14

    Kane O'Donnell

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    Oh, and I don't think you mean vector calculus, janedoe75, although the problem does involve vectors. No calculus, that's all.

    Kane
     
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