Velocity of an Object Dropped from Height: Law Explained

In summary, the height from which an object is dropped correlates with its final velocity as it falls due to the increased falling time. This follows from the mechanics of constant acceleration, but it should be noted that air resistance and terminal velocity may also play a role.
  • #1
spookeh
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Hello: I'm new here and I'm actually from the UK, but hey :biggrin:. I'm currently writing a piece of coursework on the motion of a trolley down a slope, and I was just wondering whether there was a law that states that an increase in the height from which an object is dropped positively correlates with the velocity of the object as it falls.

Thank you!
 
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  • #2
an increase in the height from which an object is dropped positively correlates with the final velocity of the object as it falls.

It has more time to fall, so it will hit at a greater speed. There isn't a law that states this, but it follows from the mechanics of constant acceleration. You might want to note something about air resistance and terminal velocity.
 
  • #3


Hello and welcome to the community! It's great to see you here and I'm happy to help with your coursework.

To answer your question, yes, there is a law that explains the relationship between the height from which an object is dropped and its velocity as it falls. This law is known as the Law of Conservation of Energy, which states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transferred or transformed.

In the case of an object being dropped from a height, it has a certain amount of potential energy due to its position in the gravitational field. As the object falls, this potential energy is converted into kinetic energy, which is the energy of motion. The higher the initial height, the more potential energy the object has, and therefore, the more kinetic energy it will have as it falls.

This means that the velocity of the object will increase as it falls from a higher height, as more potential energy is being converted into kinetic energy. However, it's important to note that this law assumes there is no air resistance or other external forces affecting the object's motion.

I hope this helps with your coursework. Best of luck with it!
 

Related to Velocity of an Object Dropped from Height: Law Explained

1. What is the equation for calculating the velocity of an object dropped from a height?

The equation for calculating the velocity of an object dropped from a height is v = √(2gh), where v is the velocity in meters per second (m/s), g is the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s²), and h is the height in meters (m).

2. How does the velocity of an object dropped from a height change over time?

The velocity of an object dropped from a height will increase at a constant rate until it reaches its maximum velocity, also known as terminal velocity. After reaching terminal velocity, the object will continue to fall at a constant speed without any further increase in velocity.

3. Can the height of the object affect its velocity when dropped?

Yes, the height of the object will affect its velocity when dropped. The higher the object is dropped from, the greater its velocity will be when it reaches the ground. This is because the object has more time to accelerate due to gravity as it falls.

4. Does the mass of the object have an impact on its velocity when dropped?

The mass of the object does not have an impact on its velocity when dropped. In a vacuum, all objects will fall at the same rate regardless of their mass. However, in the real world, air resistance can have a small impact on the velocity of an object with a larger mass.

5. How is the velocity of an object dropped from a height related to its potential energy?

The velocity of an object dropped from a height is directly related to its potential energy. As the object falls, its potential energy is converted into kinetic energy, resulting in an increase in velocity. The higher the initial potential energy, the greater the final velocity of the object will be when it reaches the ground.

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