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Velocity of sound in solids

  1. Jun 18, 2004 #1
    Most children, play with toy telephones by connecting two plastic cups with a long string. When the string is pulled tightly, sound is transmitted from one cup to the other. How does that thing work? (I 'm used to play with it but I ignored that fact).

    Another one.... doctors use stethoscope to a patient to know his physical health.... how does that thing work? I think most waves need a medium to travel... so thru what medium is the sound transmitted? =)
     
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  3. Jun 18, 2004 #2

    arildno

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    The medium in this case is the solid itself (the string in the telephone case).
     
  4. Jun 19, 2004 #3
    The medium in a stethescope is plain old air. All the tubing is hollow including the metal tubes at the top that go into the ears. These have plastic knobs on the end with a hole in them. There is a clear channel for the air from the drumlike membrane that the Doctor puts agains your body all the way up to his ears.
     
  5. Jun 25, 2004 #4
    Thanks for the help for the doctor.... =)

    Most children, play with toy telephones by connecting two plastic cups with a long string. When the string is pulled tightly, sound is transmitted from one cup to the other. How does that thing work? (I 'm used to play with it but I ignored that fact).

    Does it somethng to do with the sound traveling through the string?
     
  6. Jun 25, 2004 #5

    HallsofIvy

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    Isn't that what arildno said?
     
  7. Jun 25, 2004 #6
    Yes, but the cup is an important part of it. You can't just hold up a string and talk at it. It won't work. The cup is a good collector of the vibrations your voice is producing. These would otherwise dissipate with no effect on the string.

    So, your voice vibrates the cup, which sends sound impulses along the string, wich cause the other cup to vibrate in turn.

    Sound can travel through gas, liquid, or solid.

    This site here goes into more detail:

    Address:http://www.le.ac.uk/se/centres/sci/selfstudy/snd3.htm
     
  8. Jun 25, 2004 #7

    arildno

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    I agree with you, zoobyshoe, the cups are crucial in order to actually be able to send a sound wave through the string; however, I gave an answer to the quoted question (although, I admit, the answer was a bit short..)
     
  9. Jun 25, 2004 #8
    I know, Arildno. Sometimes the problem is people aren't sure how to specify what information they're looking for. Since he asked again I thought I'd try answering "How does that thing work?"
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2004
  10. Jun 25, 2004 #9

    arildno

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    Which you did splendidly :smile:
    The link you gave seems interesting..
     
  11. Jun 25, 2004 #10
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