Very basic binding energy question

In summary: It is bound to the Sun by the gravitational force, and the energy required to break this bond would be positive. Similarly, in a nucleus, the nucleons are bound by the strong nuclear force, and the energy required to break this bond would also be positive. So when weakly bound nuclei transform into more strongly bound nuclei, the total mass is reduced due to the energy released in the process. This is because the nucleus in its final state has a lower mass and therefore a lower mass energy compared to its initial state. This decrease in mass is due to the conversion of some of the mass into binding energy. This can be explained by Einstein's famous equation, E=mc^2, where the mass and energy are equivalent. Thus, the
  • #1
DiamondV
103
0

Homework Statement


We just started binding energy things in class starting off with e=mc^2 and well in my notes it says. "If weakly bound nuclei transform into more strongly bound nuclei, the total mass can be reduced and the mass energy of the final state is lower than the mass energy of the initial state

Homework Equations

The Attempt at a Solution


Heres how I understand that sentance.
In the initial state the nucleons inside the weakly bound nuclei are bound weakly to each other, this means that there is low binding energy between them.
In the final state the nucleons inside the strongly bound nuclei and strongly bound to each other, meaning that there is a high binding energy between them.
What I don't understand is how the "total mass can be reduced".
Also it goes on to say "and the mass energy of the final state is lower than the mass energy of the initial state"
If the binding energy is higher in the final state, surely the energy in the final state is higher? I mean unless the mass change overides that or has a greater impact than the energy change. Thats how I see it.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I did some research online and found a statement that said that energy, which was represented by Q = -Δm(c^2), is equivalent to mass. So I'm guess that's why the mass can be reduced, because the total energy was less. Forgive me if I'm wrong, I'm taking AP Physics 1 which doesn't really cover binding energy.
 
  • #3
Read:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_binding_energy

Nuclear binding energy
is the energy that would be required to disassemble the nucleus of an atom into its component parts. These component parts are neutrons and protons, which are collectively called nucleons. The binding energy of nuclei is due to the attractive forces that hold these nucleons together and this is usually a positive number, since most nuclei would require the expenditure of energy to separate them into individual protons and neutrons. The mass of an atomic nucleus is usually less than the sum of the individual masses of the constituent protons and neutrons (according to Einstein's equation E=mc2) and this 'missing mass' is known as the mass defect, and represents the energy that was released when the nucleus was formed.[/qoute]

So the nucleus is at a lower energy with respect to the energy of the free nuclei. Taking that energy zero, the energy of the nucleus is negative, just as its mass is less than the sum of masses of the constituents.

The energy of a bounded system is lower than the energy of the free constituents. Think of a planet and the Sun. The planet orbiting around the Sun has negative energy.
 

1. What is binding energy?

Binding energy refers to the amount of energy required to break apart the nucleus of an atom into its individual protons and neutrons.

2. How is binding energy calculated?

Binding energy is calculated using the famous equation E=mc², where E represents energy, m represents mass, and c is the speed of light.

3. Why is binding energy important?

Binding energy is important because it helps us understand the stability of atoms. The more tightly bound the nucleus is, the more stable the atom is.

4. What factors affect binding energy?

The main factors that affect binding energy are the number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus, as well as the strength of the nuclear force that holds them together.

5. How is binding energy related to nuclear reactions?

In nuclear reactions, energy is either released or absorbed depending on the binding energy of the nuclei involved. When nuclei with high binding energy are formed, energy is released, while energy is absorbed when nuclei with low binding energy are formed.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
429
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
759
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
785
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
2
Views
671
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
821
Back
Top