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Very difficult problem

  1. Nov 20, 2006 #1
    You have a metal string and a magnetic field in the same direction of the rope-s axis.
    The rope has two fixed extremes.
    Find the general solution of the oscillations(transverse and longitudinal).
    Data:
    density of mass
    linear density of charge P
    arbitrary initial conditions
    magnetic induction B
    Use every data you want, the impotant thing is the solution of the problem
    I think PDE are necesary to solve this problem
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2006
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 21, 2006 #2

    berkeman

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    Welcome to PF, dukeh. You must show your work in order for us to help you. What do you know about oscillations on a rope with fixed ends? And what in the world does a magnetic field have to do with a non-conducting rope?
     
  4. Nov 21, 2006 #3
    Its not a rope, its a metal string. Thanks for the observation.
     
  5. Nov 21, 2006 #4
    I know the string equations from the book Tikhonov Samarski about PDE, but those aparently are not enough
     
  6. Nov 21, 2006 #5

    OlderDan

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    I think you are expected to assume the linear charge density is constant along the length of the string. At least it should be assumed to start out that way. If you were to pluck the string and set up a standing wave the charges in motion would interact with the magnetic field. What effect would this have on the string? What do you think the steady state solution would be?
     
  7. Nov 22, 2006 #6
    the linear density of charche is constant, its not a distribution
    the density of mass is also constant
    The physical interpretation is one of the problems I have had, I would really appreciate any colaboration with the problem.
     
  8. Nov 22, 2006 #7

    OlderDan

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    What happens to a charged particle that is moving perpendicular to a magnetic field?
     
  9. Nov 23, 2006 #8
    Please help!
     
  10. Nov 23, 2006 #9

    berkeman

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    Show your work.
     
  11. Nov 26, 2006 #10

    OlderDan

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    You can use this derivation as a guide

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/waves/waveq.html#c3

    There will be an addional force term related to the motion of charges in the magnetic field. Instead of looking for a solution where y is a function of x and t, look for a solution to r(x) independent of time where the acceleration from all the forces acting on a mass dm is a centripetal acceleration. r(x) is the displacement of the string from equilibrium at point x.
     
  12. Nov 27, 2006 #11

    OlderDan

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    A solution exists with the string in a rotational mode, which happens to be a valid solution whether the magnetic field is present or not. Try grabbing the end of a rope held firmly at the opposite end and see if you can set up a standing rotational wave by moving your hand in a circle.

    The full solution to any string plucking problem is rather complex. If you have to work out the solution including all the transient motion, then you still have to recognize that the velocity dependent force from the magnetic field is going to drive the string out of plane and it will eventually work its way into the rotational mode.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2006
  13. Nov 27, 2006 #12
    dukeh, stop wasting everyone's time. i'm not sure how you got to where you are with that HORRIBLE spelling. "You dont know nothing about Fhysics"

    Hahaha. Go back to grade 10.
     
  14. Nov 27, 2006 #13

    OlderDan

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    Why don't you just post your solution to the problem?
     
  15. Nov 27, 2006 #14

    Doc Al

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    bye bye

    That will be enough of that.
     
  16. Nov 27, 2006 #15

    berkeman

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    I just looked up the definition of "patience" in my dictionary, and Dan's picture was there.

    I'm locking this thread for now. Maybe we should just delete the dang thing.
     
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