Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Vibrations in a solution

  1. Jan 24, 2015 #1
    Hi, I was wondering if someone can explain to me the following. If I have a vibrating molecule in a solution, what effect would this vibration have on other particles in my solution which are different. Can the vibration be the same for them if they are not excited (do not vibrate due to excitation) can they duplicate the vibration of the excited molecule with lower intensity?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 24, 2015 #2

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    You cannot classify vibrations as "this is due to excitation / this is not". Every vibration is an excitation relative to the ground state.

    In general, excited molecules can transfer some energy to molecules nearby.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Vibrations in a solution
  1. Vibrational Entropy (Replies: 2)

  2. Vibration of atoms (Replies: 4)

  3. "Locality" of phonons (Replies: 9)

Loading...