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Violation of octet rule

  1. May 10, 2006 #1
    Is there any violation of the octet rule in the second period elements?
    -scott
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 10, 2006 #2
    Yes, beryllium typically bonds with 4 electrons (ie BeF2) and boron with 6 (BF3). Flourine is often involved in bonds that have more than 8 electrons (XeF4).
     
  4. May 10, 2006 #3

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    Also the superoxide radical, O2 with an extra electron. It's found in biological systems.
     
  5. May 10, 2006 #4

    Hootenanny

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    Just to add, this is a biradical, with an unpaired electron on each oxygen atom.

    ~H
     
  6. May 19, 2006 #5

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    You mean singlet oxygen? That's different. In that case you haven't added an electron, in superoxide you have one more electron than you do in the regular oxygen molecule.

    Anyway, I think that I was wrong. You can draw a Lewis structure for superoxide radical where you have 3 lone pairs on one O and two lone pairs plus one electron on the other, with a bond between the two. In that resonance structure it's not an octet rule violation. My mistake.
     
  7. May 19, 2006 #6
    What about S8?
    -scott
     
  8. May 19, 2006 #7

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    S is in the 3rd period....

    Also, S8 is a ring of sulfur atoms, so there is no violation.
     
  9. May 30, 2006 #8
    Why is octet configuration stable?
     
  10. May 30, 2006 #9

    Gokul43201

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    It just is.

    Careful quantum calculations show that there is a deep local minimum of the potential energy for filled ns and np subshells. There are also shallow local minima at half-filled subshells. These are just the results of very complex calculations and it's hard to simplify things - in my opinion - to any considerable extent without being "a little" dishonest.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2006
  11. May 30, 2006 #10

    NateTG

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    Nitrogen does interesting stuff as well - like in hydrazine
     
  12. May 30, 2006 #11
    thanks Gokul
    I would request you to explain the difference between a wave and a particle? How would you describe the behaviour of an electron as a wave(qualitatively)?
     
  13. May 30, 2006 #12

    Gokul43201

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    Malay, this question is fairly unrelated to the rest of this thread.

    I have a couple of suggestions for you.

    1. Read post #3 in the Physics FAQ thread : https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=104715
    It does not directly answer your question, but addresses some part of it.

    2. If you still have something you want to ask, start a new thread in the appropriate Physics subforum - General Physics will work - and ask your question there.
     
  14. May 31, 2006 #13
    Thanks for your help
     
  15. May 31, 2006 #14
    Why does oxygen not form o8, since it is in the same family as sulfur?Also what about the Boranes?
     
  16. May 31, 2006 #15

    Gokul43201

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    One reason is the steric strain. Larger atoms like S, Se, Te can more easily accomodate non-ideal bond angles that are necessary to make the ring structures.

    What about the boranes? Yes, they do not satisfy octets in general (see post#2, by cesium). Also look into Wade's rules for constructing boranes with n electron pairs.
     
  17. Mar 2, 2007 #16
    Does that mean that XeF4 follows the octet rule?
     
  18. Mar 5, 2007 #17
    try and draw out the structure of XeF4 and count the electrons. If you draw the correct structure your question should be answered.
     
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