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Visiting LHC?

  1. Feb 12, 2010 #1
    If I were to make it to Switzerland on my own (maybe as part of a business trip, followed by a few days off ...) would it be possible to tour the collider?
     
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  3. Feb 12, 2010 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    No. The tunnels are all interlocked, and access to them is very, very strictly controlled. It's a radiation hazard area, an oxygen deficiency hazard area, an electrical hazard area, a cryogenic hazard area, and I'm sure I forgot some.
     
  4. Feb 12, 2010 #3

    Borg

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    You could do it as part of an upcoming Bright Horizons cruise.
    http://www.insightcruises.com/top_g/sa08_top.html" [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  5. Feb 12, 2010 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    No, that gives a tour of CERN. Not a tour of the LHC.
     
  6. Feb 12, 2010 #5

    Borg

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    Oh. I saw LHC mentioned and thought that it was part of the tour as well.
     
  7. Feb 12, 2010 #6
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  8. Feb 12, 2010 #7

    Astronuc

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  9. Feb 12, 2010 #8
    The accelerator I work with, sometimes we have "dignified" visitors for whom we may even stop the machine so they can enjoy (?) a tour. Of course, they must be escorted. The point is that once the machine is stopped and there is no prompt radiation, a survey is performed to make sure the area was not activated above safe levels, and so that the accelerator tunnel can be visited safely, without prior training if one is escorted.

    Suppose CERN would turn off the LHC and there is no more prompt radiation. What are the typical radiation levels from activation in the tunnel after say a couple of hours ?
     
  10. Feb 12, 2010 #9
    I would be interested in the distribution for electrical power. It must be an enormous distribution. How many electrical services and how large are some of the bigger switchgear and transformers? What feeds that thing? That also must be a gigantic amount of conduit, cable tray, and wire (hundreds of tons of it?) I would have loved to have helped build the LHC. I wonder how many electricians were employed building the LHC. Those are the sorts of questions I would ask.
     
  11. Feb 12, 2010 #10

    Monique

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    The other day I watched a documentary named Higgs. It followed some of the researchers as they were preparing for the initiation of the system and also interviewed Mr Higgs himself. It was really impressive watching those people walk around in the tunnels of the collider, what a system! They also showed the damage that was caused by a break in the tube, which definitely indicated that you don't want to be there when that happens.
     
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