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Volts/Div Scale

  1. Oct 7, 2007 #1
    Hey guys

    If the output of the function generator for a sinusoidal waveform is 6 voltage divisons peak to peak along the voltage axis- and the voltmeter reads 2.12v, find the volts/div scale that is being used?

    for this do just divide the volt given by the division given?, please help,(pretty new)


    thanks a lot
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 7, 2007 #2
    Anyone, really need with this by today?

    sorry and thanks again
     
  4. Oct 7, 2007 #3

    dlgoff

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    The voltmeter will measure RMS voltage for a.c.
     
  5. Oct 7, 2007 #4
    how do use the voltage to find the scale? sorry really new
     
  6. Oct 7, 2007 #5

    dlgoff

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    Well the peak voltage is 3 volts. Correct? Now what is the effective voltage (root-mean-square, RMS)?
     
  7. Oct 7, 2007 #6
    2.12, .707(3), which is the value from the voltmeter
     
  8. Oct 7, 2007 #7

    dlgoff

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    Okay. I'm not sure what you're are really asking. A volt is a volt. On your scope you are seeing 6 volts p-p (1volt per division) on your rms meter you are seeing 2.12 volts (what scale on your meter are you using here?)
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2007
  9. Oct 7, 2007 #8
    How did u know that it is 1 volt per divison, thanks, i think that is what i wanted
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2007
  10. Oct 7, 2007 #9

    dlgoff

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    By scale, I mean what range your voltmeter was set. If for example, it was set on a 6 volts range and there were 6 division marks, then one division would be 1 volt. If there were 12 division marks, then one division would be 0.5 volt. Now your meter might be good enough to have a division mark for every 0.1 volt, the volt/div would be 0.1. i.e. for your meter, take the full range voltage and divide by the number of divisions on the scale. I guess that is what you were thinking in the first place. Sorry.

    Regards
     
  11. Oct 8, 2007 #10
    Do you mean volt meter or oscilloscope?
     
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