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Volume vs Temperature

  1. Mar 29, 2016 #1
    What are two aspects in which the volume expansion of liquids and the volume expansion of gases due to a temperature change vary?

    Answer:
    One of the aspects is that gases can be more easily heated than liquids. This is because there are intermolecular forces (Van Der Waals interactions) holding the molecules in a liquid together. Therefore, it would take energy to break these intermolecular bonds making liquids harder to heat than gases. In gases, there are also intermolecular forces; however the distance between the molecules is so great that the intermolecular forces are considered negligible. The second aspect is that in a liquid, a change in temperature is directly proportional to a change in volume. While a change in temperature of a gas is not directly proportional to change in volume in a liquid.

    Could you please tell me if my answer is correct because I think that it is not> And could you explain to me what is the answer then. Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 29, 2016 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    At constant pressure, the volume change is directly proportional to the temperature change for a gas... so you need a bit of qualification there.
    There is no need to break intermolecular forces, nor assume them negligible for a gas.
     
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