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Volumes in pipes

  1. Dec 19, 2012 #1
    Hi

    How much volume would be in the following round pipes

    1. 1000mm x 50mm
    2. 1000mm x 76mm
    3. 1000mm x 101mm

    1 liquid has a S.G = 1
    1 liquid has a S.G = 1.30

    Any help appreciated

    IJC7
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 19, 2012 #2

    sophiecentaur

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    Hi
    This link (the post at the top of the Forum) tells you to post homework questions in the appropriate place and to provide some evidence that you have actually tried it yourself. What would be the point in someone giving you a 'letter' as an answer? What are your thought about this problem?
     
  4. Dec 19, 2012 #3
    It is not my homework....i am 50+ just needed it for work..this is something i do not do just got asked the question myself..i am no engineer,i just posted here for some help....
     
  5. Dec 19, 2012 #4
    1. 1000mm x 50mm
    2. 1000mm x 76mm
    3. 1000mm x 101mm

    1 liquid has a S.G = 1
    1 liquid has a S.G = 1.30

    I am assuming the three pipes listed above are in the format L x D where L is the length of the pipe and D is the diameter.

    If that is the case, the Volume enclosed in a cylindrical pipe is

    V = L x (Area of circular cross section)
    V = L x (3.14 * (radius)^2)

    V = L * 3.14 * (1/4)* D^2

    The liquid properties has nothing to do with the volume of a pipe. As an analogy, if you have two identical jars and you fill one with water and the other with oil, both jars have the same volume. The jar does not care what liquid is place inside it.

    Hope that helps.
     
  6. Dec 19, 2012 #5

    CWatters

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    Are those dimensions Length * Internal Diameter?

    If so then the equation you need and the answers are:

    Volume (mm3) = Length (mm) * cross sectional area (mm2)
    where
    cross sectional area = D2 * Pi/4
    Pi = 3.14
    D=diameter in mm

    To convert from mm3 to Liters divide by 1,000,000.

    So..

    1) 1000 * 502 * 3.14/4 = 1962500 mm3 or just over 1.96L

    2) 1000 * 762 * 3.14/4 = 4534160 mm3 or just over 4.53L

    3) 1000 * 1012 * 3.14/4 = 8007785 mm3 or just over 8L

    Edit: Ah I see rdbateman just beat me to it.
     
  7. Dec 19, 2012 #6

    CWatters

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    PS If the dimensions are the external diameter then the volume will be less. For example if your 50mm pipe has a 1mm wall thickness and so an internal diameter of 48mm the volume reduces from 1.96 L to 1.81L a reduction of about 7%.
     
  8. Dec 19, 2012 #7
    I would like to kindly thank those who helped with my question....much appreciated
     
  9. Dec 19, 2012 #8

    sophiecentaur

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    Sorry about my original frosty reply but we get an awful lot of students who just want the answer so they can finish their assignment without thinking about it. (Not PF style) Perhaps some pre-amble to that sort of question would make it appear more like an 'adult' question.
     
  10. Dec 19, 2012 #9
    I believe that since it is after December 14, the probability of a post between now and New Years that was made for Homework Help is very close to 0.
     
  11. Dec 20, 2012 #10

    sophiecentaur

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    Ha ha - you should come to the UK. Today is the last day of School in Primary and Secondary schools and, if A Level students were not sent home with a load of past Physics paper questions to answer over the holidays, their parents (though not the students themselves) would be really complaining.
    I'm sure you would have been able to look up "volume of a cylinder" - a bright lad like you! :wink:
     
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