Vultures have no butt hole

  1. A few people recently have told me that vultures have no butt hole. They said they regurgitate everything they eat. I don't know why I keep hearing people say this. They don't specify what kind of vulture, which makes it sound even more wrong. I'm not the type of person to flat out say somebody is wrong unless I know for sure that they're wrong.
    I looked it up online and I can't find anything. It's kind of an obscure thing to look for, so I'm not surprised I didn't find anything. But if they didn't have a butt hole, they'd be an anomaly and it would be pretty easy to find something saying they don't.
    So they do have a butt hole, right?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. turbo

    turbo 7,365
    Gold Member

    Re: Vultures

    The word "gullible" is not in the dictionary. It's true!
     
  4. Re: Vultures

    I tried to make it clear I did not believe them. But when I haven't seen a vulture's butt, I can't say for sure that they have one. Does it break a biological rule for an animal not to have one?
     
  5. turbo

    turbo 7,365
    Gold Member

    Re: Vultures

    Even worms have an alimentary system so that they can consume food, absorb vital nutrients and excrete waste. Should vultures get a free pass?
     
  6. Re: Vultures

    Should they? I have no preference for how vultures excrete waste. I understand that they must, and I'm sure they do it just like everything else, I just wanted to make sure they do. Could they regurgitate their waste? I don't know. That's why I asked.
     
  7. lisab

    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Vultures

    Perhaps some people believe this because vultures vomit as a defense mechanism.

    http://vulturesociety.homestead.com/TVFacts.html#anchor_13531
     
  8. Astronuc

    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Vultures

    All birds poop. So do mammals, amphibians, fish and reptiles.

    Here's an example of pigeon viscera - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:PigeonAnatomy.png
    from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crop_(anatomy)

    The Digestive Tract of the Whiteback Griffon Vulture and Its Role in Disease Transmission Among Wild Ungulates
    http://www.jwildlifedis.org/cgi/reprint/11/3/306.pdf
    Unfortunately there is no illustration, but it is descriptive.
     
    suzyq likes this.
  9. Borek

    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Vultures

    I feel like there is some kind of brain/butt hole switch involved, I am just not sure about details.

    That said there are animals that don't have butt holes at all - cnidaria.
     
  10. Re: Vultures

    In birds its called a cloaca, or vent. Its not correct to call it a anus or butt, in birds its serves more then one purpose. So your friend is correct, but not in the way he thinks he is.
    Some birds do regurgitate indigestible matter, these are called pellets.
     
    suzyq likes this.
  11. Re: Vultures

    Thanks for the info, guys.
    One of them said that he and his wife heard it, didn't believe it, so they checked it online and found it to be true. I don't know what they found, but I couldn't find it. They probably found a forum post with someone "confirming" it. Some people think that finding one other person who believes the same thing they do qualifies as validation.
     
  12. Re: Vultures

    A friend lives adjacent to open land in Andalucia, Spain. Recently she has found strange, tennis ball sized, mushroom shaped objects on the open ground. These objects appear to have gravel on top and contain blood and bone. Could they be pellets from the Griffon vultures, which abound in these parts?
     
  13. Ryan_m_b

    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Vultures

    Eeny this thread is over a year old and about a completely different topic. If you are interested in an answer for your question feel free to start a new thread for just that.
     
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