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Stargazing Watching sun eclipse at sunset

  1. Jul 27, 2008 #1
    There's coming sun eclipse on Aug 1. I know that looking directly at the sun even though it is mostly obscured is unsafe to the eyes. But is it safe if I look at the sun eclipse when it is about to set?
     
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  3. Jul 27, 2008 #2

    russ_watters

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  4. Jul 27, 2008 #3

    Redbelly98

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    Note, solar eclipses are only dangerous during partial eclipse phases. During totality (and only then), it is safe and quite spectacular to watch.
     
  5. Jul 27, 2008 #4
    So why many people, including myself, still look at the sunset, and sometimes it's very spectacular. Don't you think the thick atmosphere has absorbed most of the radiation?
     
  6. Jul 27, 2008 #5

    mgb_phys

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    Frankly yes - but if you tell people it's OK they will then decide to try it at noon, then someone will do the same with binoculars or a telescope - so it's safer to just tell everyone not to look at the sun.
     
  7. Jul 27, 2008 #6

    russ_watters

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    It does, but the problem is that the amount of absorption is not necessarily constant, so it can quickly get brighter. The reality is that you are unlikely to harm your eyes watching a sunset, but it is not, strictly speaking, safe.

    One important thing to note about eclipses, during the eclipse, the intensity of the sunlight does not decrease (until totality) even though the total light reaching earth does. That means that being partly eclipsed doesn't decrease the sun's potential for eye injury.
     
  8. Jul 27, 2008 #7
    Thanks all for your contribution.
    I have just found this :

    "..The KASI said Tuesday's eclipse can be safely observed with just dark sunglasses or through cellophane paper because the sun greatly loses its brightness right before it sets. "One can observe the phenomenon from an open mountain with a clear view of the west or from the seashore looking in the direction where the sun goes down," institute said."

    link: http://english.chosun.com/w21data/html/news/200807/200807280014.html
     
  9. Jul 28, 2008 #8

    LURCH

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    A couple years ago I watched a partial eclipse at sunset. I live out in farm country, so I drove nutil I found a big plowed field and parked my car at the western end of the field facing east. Even though it was a fairly hazy day, and the sun was quite low, it still felt a bit painfull to look at it, so I scooched up in my seat 'till I was looking through the tinted part fo my windshield. That provided all the protection I needed.

    I think it's a good idea to take along some UV-blocking sunglasses, or a CD, in acse ti is a particularly bright sunset that day.
     
  10. Aug 2, 2008 #9

    Redbelly98

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    So, did anybody in here get to see it?
     
  11. Aug 2, 2008 #10

    Garth

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    Eclipse

    Garth
     
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