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Water as fuel

  1. Aug 3, 2016 #1
    hello guys, how to convert the water into a fuel
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 3, 2016 #2

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Welcome to the PF.

    Do you mean for use in a nuclear fusion reactor? Or do you have some pseudo-science in mind...
     
  4. Aug 3, 2016 #3
    because i see some people here in my ountry using water into his motor cycle and car ^_^ i'm little it enterested
     
  5. Aug 3, 2016 #4

    berkeman

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    That is in their radiators, not for fuel.
     
  6. Aug 3, 2016 #5

    berkeman

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    Also, "Water as Fuel" is on the list of Forbidden Topics (pseudo-science) in the PF rules. This thread is closed.

     
  7. Aug 3, 2016 #6

    DrClaude

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    Water is a "low energy," stable molecule. It is one of the product of combustion, i.e., what you get after a "high energy" molecule has reacted and released its stored energy. It cannot be used as a fuel.
     
  8. Aug 3, 2016 #7

    berkeman

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    Thread will be re-opened to discuss how small amounts of water can be used in certain ways in internal combustion engines to affect performance..
     
  9. Aug 3, 2016 #8

    sophiecentaur

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    The actual "fuel" thing is nonsense but I do know that there is a practice of introducing small amounts of water (in droplet form) into the carburettor manifold. This will boil and form steam at high pressure, which can increase the compression ratio of a 'tired' engine. This was a popular bit of fun in the past but is responsible for damaging many engines and cracking cylinder heads. That can spoil your day.
     
  10. Aug 3, 2016 #9

    Nugatory

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    Water injection was once used to control detonation (explosion of the compressed air-fuel mixture, as opposed to a very fast but smooth burn propagating through it) in extremely high-performance turbocharged and supercharged motors.

    Modern computer-controlled engine management systems don't need this. They have sensors that detect detonation and modulate boost, spark timing, fuel injection, and sometimes even valve timing to hold the motor at peak performance, just short of detonation.
     
  11. Aug 3, 2016 #10

    etudiant

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    Water injection was routinely used in turbo compound piston engines as well as in early jet engines. The water soaked up some of the heat from the air compression, turning into steam. That cools the compressor and increases the engine mass flow, giving a good power gain. Current day car turbochargers use an intercooler as a less costly option, jets mostly now use a bigger fan to move more air. The basic idea though resurfaces in some hypersonic concepts, where hydrogen is used to cool the incoming air to get added mass and thrust.

    Separately there have been lots of scams involving water fuelled engines. Google turns up multiple pages if you look.
     
  12. Aug 3, 2016 #11
    Yes most of the nonsense 'water fueled engine' concepts involve using electricity to separate water into Hydrogen and Oxygen then use these gases as fuel for a combustion engine.
    However that's pointless because the same amount of electricity can be used much more efficiently to supply power to a normal electric motor.
     
  13. Aug 9, 2016 #12

    DrClaude

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    Water cannot be used as fuel. Discussion of pseudoscience/scams is not allowed on PF.

    Thread closed.
     
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