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Water Flowing from a Tank

  1. Apr 20, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    Link to picture: http://session.masteringphysics.com/problemAsset/1011222/12/yf_Figure_14_41.jpg

    Water flows steadily from an open tank as shown in the figure. The elevation of point 1 is 10.0 m, and the elevation of points 2 and 3 is 2.00 m. The cross-sectional area at point 2 is 4.80×10−2 m^2; at point 3, where the water is discharged, it is 1.60×10−2 m^2. The cross-sectional area of the tank is very large compared with the cross-sectional area of the pipe.


    2. Relevant equations

    Delta V = (A)(v)( Delta t)

    A1(v)1=A2(v)2

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I can't figure this out.

    To know the velocity of at point 3, dont you have to know the area of the main tank, to get the velocity at point 2, and then point 3?

    The Area of point 2 and 3 is given, but no velocity, so what am I missing??
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 20, 2009 #2
    So it ask:

    Assuming that Bernoulli's equation applies, compute the volume of water DeltaV that flows across the exit of the pipe in 1.00 {\rm s}. In other words, find the discharge rate \Delta V/\Delta t.
     
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