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Water purification process

  1. Mar 22, 2015 #1
    Hello thanks for looking at my post. I run a farm and we are having water quality issues. I have come up with a possible solution but implementing is causing issues. I have drawn a very basic design. My main issue is the pressure of the water. The system will be gravity feed but the water level is above the entire system so if I just released the tap it would run to the collector without being purified. Does anyone know of a design which can help me stop the flow at the "boiler" spot? Ideally I would like the same amount of water to trickle in equal to the amount which leaves as steam. The other question I don't know is since this is a closed system am I going to have issues with the particles in the water which do not convert to steam? I was thinking to solve this problem I could make the boiler detachable so i could clean it. Again thanks for the help looking at . http://postimg.org/image/amkscj30r
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 22, 2015 #2
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2015
  4. Apr 2, 2015 #3

    rbelli1

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    Can you say what is exactly wrong with the water? Are you trying to sterilize it, distil it, or just filter it using team pressure?

    BoB
     
  5. Apr 2, 2015 #4
    Hello thanks for replying i am trying to sterilize it. i am using a fresnel lense as my source of heat (which i will probably change to a parabolic mirror)

    here is a good vid



    but i am having issues controlling the flow of water.
     
  6. Apr 2, 2015 #5

    mfb

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    Can you lift the pipe for steam enough to make its upper end higher than the initial water level? That would be sufficient if the boiler is powerful enough.
    There are valves that maintain a specific pressure difference between the two sides (= they open only if the difference exceeds that value, which has the same effect as lowering your water tank by some specific distance).

    It is probably useful to filter the water first, but even if you do that dissolved things will accumulate in the boiler.
     
  7. Apr 2, 2015 #6
    I have no problem moving the pipe to any level. the difficulty i have is that i do not know of these valves you are referring to and the logistical question of which one to pick.


    i would do an initial filter to get larger sediment out.

    thanks
     
  8. Apr 2, 2015 #7

    mfb

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    That is much easier than valves then.
     
  9. Apr 3, 2015 #8
    I see what you are saying and that makes sense. I do have a concern that my boiler needs to remain small due to nature of heat source.

    My boiler would have to either have the same length as my water table or use small boiler similar to my picture except allow the steam pipe to be higher. With the second option I would have water in my steam pipe and my heat source is below a good bit of water. Which might work. Just take longer to initially get the water to boil point.

    One option ( if it exists) is a device that only allows steam to pass through and not water. Do you think that viable ? Or possible?

    Thanks for looking at


    (Also if you are wondering why go through all this when there are other systems I could buy . is because we are non profit farm who tries to find organic means to solve problems , and I think it is neat)
     
  10. Apr 3, 2015 #9

    mfb

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    That was the idea.
    Gore-Tex and similar materials do that for rain, I don't know how well they perform with constant water pressure from one side.
     
  11. Apr 3, 2015 #10
    Thanks for the input I have a few ideas to tinker with.

    Will post a pic if I get it to work
     
  12. Apr 7, 2015 #11
    Sterilize or sanitize it? You can kill a lot of bacteria just from heating the water to 55 degreec C for a reasonable period of time. However, you'll still probably need to filter it.
     
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