Wave nature of light problem

  • Thread starter leolaw
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  • #1
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Given a wavelength length [tex]\alpha[/tex], what is the maximum Width (D) of a single slit, which would have no diffraction minima?

It seems like a proof problem to me and I am trying to get a head start.
should I use [tex] D * sin (\theta) = m \alpha[/tex] ?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
OlderDan
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leolaw said:
Given a wavelength length [tex]\alpha[/tex], what is the maximum Width (D) of a single slit, which would have no diffraction minima?

It seems like a proof problem to me and I am trying to get a head start.
should I use [tex] D * sin (\theta) = m \alpha[/tex] ?
Yes, that and what you know about the sine function.
 
  • #3
85
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that sin of zero degrees is 0
 
  • #4
OlderDan
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leolaw said:
that sin of zero degrees is 0
Yes, but at zero degrees you will never have a minimum. From the geometry of the single slit diffraction setup, to not find any minima after the slit, the angle [itex] \theta [/itex] would have to be 90 degrees for the first minimum. So then what does

[tex] D * sin (\theta) = m \alpha[/tex]

tell you about D?
 
  • #5
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I see, so [tex]D sin (90) = (1) \alpha[/tex], which is the first minimum, and D has to be equal to the wavelength [tex]\alpha[/tex].
 

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