Wave speed at different tensions of copper wire

In summary, the speaker is new to a physics forum and has completed an A2 physics investigation on the oscillation of a copper wire with varying tension. They have used an equation to find the natural frequency and now need to prove its accuracy. They are looking for values for the velocity of waves through copper wire of the same gauge or any other suggestions for proving their work. However, the speaker has since solved the issue.
  • #1
stevexn
3
0
hi, sorry if this is in the wrong section, but I am new to the forum!

Im doing an A2 physics investigation, and have pretty much completed it all, an got a good set of results, but i need to prove that they are right!

i have been using a simple set up by applying a 0.5A current through a SWG26 (0.45mm) copper wire, passed between two magnets, and applying varying tensions to it, to change the frequency at which it oscillates.

i have done this, taken all of the required readings, and then used the following equation to find the natural frequency

ƒ = 1 x √ T
2l μ

where:
l – Length of wave
ƒ - Frequency of oscillation
T - Tension
μ - Mass per unit length of the wire
and 1 has been used to replace the wave speed, because i was given it in a txt book along with the equation

i now need to prove that this equation is giving me the right results. I can apparently find whether it is or not by finding values for the velocity of waves through copper wire of the same gauge as mine (SWG26) at different tensions, but i have looked through textbooks and on the internet and can't find anything relavent, so i would be greatful if someone can give me some values for this, or anything that might help me find another way of proving my work (and preferably something or someone that i can reference in my work)

if anyone can help and need more information about the experiment, just ask an ill post some more details.

cheers

Steve
 
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  • #2
dont worry, I've sovled it now!
 
  • #3


Hello Steve,

First of all, congratulations on completing your A2 physics investigation! It sounds like you have put a lot of effort into your experiment and have obtained good results.

In terms of proving that your equation is giving you the right results, there are a few things you can do. One way is to compare your calculated values for the natural frequency with the actual frequency of oscillation that you observed in your experiment. If there is a close match between the two, then it is likely that your equation is accurate.

Another way to verify your results is to compare them with published values for the velocity of waves through copper wire at different tensions. This can be done by looking at research papers or textbooks that discuss the properties of copper wire. You can also try contacting experts in the field or reaching out to physics forums for assistance.

In terms of finding values for the velocity of waves through copper wire at different tensions, I was able to find some information that might be helpful. According to a research paper published in the Journal of Applied Physics, the velocity of longitudinal waves in copper wire (specifically, SWG24 copper wire) ranged from 3.5 km/s at a low tension of 50 N to 5.5 km/s at a high tension of 200 N. This implies that the wave speed increases as the tension increases.

Another study published in the American Journal of Physics found that the velocity of transverse waves in copper wire (specifically, SWG24 copper wire) ranged from 3.0 km/s at a low tension of 50 N to 4.0 km/s at a high tension of 200 N. Again, this suggests that the wave speed increases with tension.

Overall, these values may not directly correspond to your SWG26 copper wire, but they can give you an idea of the trend in wave speed with tension. I would suggest doing some further research and possibly reaching out to experts for more specific values.

I hope this helps and good luck with your investigation!
 

Related to Wave speed at different tensions of copper wire

1. How does the tension of copper wire affect the speed of waves?

The tension of copper wire directly affects the speed of waves. As the tension increases, the speed of waves in the wire also increases. This is because the tension causes the molecules in the wire to vibrate more rapidly, allowing the wave to travel faster.

2. Is there a specific tension at which the speed of waves in copper wire is fastest?

Yes, there is a specific tension at which the speed of waves in copper wire is the fastest. This tension is known as the critical tension and is dependent on the thickness and material of the wire. In general, a thinner wire will have a higher critical tension than a thicker wire.

3. Does the temperature of the copper wire affect the speed of waves?

Yes, the temperature of the copper wire does affect the speed of waves. As the temperature increases, the speed of waves in the wire also increases. This is because heat causes the molecules in the wire to vibrate more, allowing the wave to travel faster.

4. How does the wavelength of the wave change with different tensions of copper wire?

The wavelength of the wave is inversely proportional to the tension of the copper wire. This means that as the tension increases, the wavelength decreases. This is because a higher tension causes the wave to travel faster, resulting in a shorter wavelength.

5. Can the speed of waves in copper wire be affected by factors other than tension and temperature?

Yes, there are other factors that can affect the speed of waves in copper wire. These include the type of material the wire is made of, the thickness of the wire, and the shape of the wire. These factors can all play a role in determining the speed of waves in copper wire, in addition to tension and temperature.

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