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Wavefunction, blackhole

  1. Jul 4, 2003 #1

    jby

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    Does a blackhole have a wavefunction?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 5, 2003 #2
    Sure. Everything "has" a wavefunction. The problem is we don't know it.
     
  4. Jul 5, 2003 #3

    Ivan Seeking

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    Some Quantum Cosmologists work on [the idea] of a wave function for the entire universe. By this it is also suggested that we don't collapse wave functions: When I look at a gauge, I leap into a superposition of eigenstates.
     
  5. Jul 5, 2003 #4

    drag

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    Re: Re: wavefunction, blackhole

    Or... you just leap into one while your other "you" leaps
    into another...
     
  6. Jul 5, 2003 #5

    Ivan Seeking

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    Re: Re: Re: wavefunction, blackhole

    Which one of me were all of you speaking to?
     
  7. Jul 5, 2003 #6

    jby

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    Re: Re: wavefunction, blackhole

    What do you mean?
     
  8. Jul 5, 2003 #7

    jby

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    Why not? What makes it difficult compared to microscopic objects?
    If we were to start off a search to develop the wavefunction for a blackhole, what are the conditions must the wavefunction that we will get fulfill?
     
  9. Jul 6, 2003 #8

    Ivan Seeking

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    Re: Re: Re: wavefunction, blackhole

    I don't know.

    Although I got this directly from Dr. Steve Carlip -
    http://www.physics.ucdavis.edu/Text/Carlip.html

    - I am not sure if this information is on his web site. Quantum Cosmology sites should have some discussions.

    Perhaps someone else can help here?
     
  10. Jul 6, 2003 #9

    jeff

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    This pointless post was brought to you by the three stooges smileys
     
  11. Jul 7, 2003 #10
    Normally (for microscopic objects that is) we look for eigenstates of the Hamiltonian but a macroscopic object is not in an eigenstate.
     
  12. Jul 7, 2003 #11

    jby

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    In this quantum case, how do you exactly explain eigenstate? And why doesn't a macroscopic object be in an eigenstate? Can there be any chances that the object be in an eigenstate?
     
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