Wavefunction, blackhole

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Does a black hole have a wavefunction?
 

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  • #2
heumpje
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Sure. Everything "has" a wavefunction. The problem is we don't know it.
 
  • #3
Ivan Seeking
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Originally posted by jby
Does a black hole have a wavefunction?

Some Quantum Cosmologists work on [the idea] of a wave function for the entire universe. By this it is also suggested that we don't collapse wave functions: When I look at a gauge, I leap into a superposition of eigenstates.
 
  • #4
drag
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Originally posted by Ivan Seeking
When I look at a gauge, I leap into a superposition of eigenstates.
Or... you just leap into one while your other "you" leaps
into another...
 
  • #5
Ivan Seeking
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Originally posted by drag
Or... you just leap into one while your other "you" leaps
into another...

Which one of me were all of you speaking to?
 
  • #6


Originally posted by Ivan Seeking
When I look at a gauge, I leap into a superposition of eigenstates.

What do you mean?
 
  • #7
Originally posted by heumpje
Sure. Everything "has" a wavefunction. The problem is we don't know it.

Why not? What makes it difficult compared to microscopic objects?
If we were to start off a search to develop the wavefunction for a black hole, what are the conditions must the wavefunction that we will get fulfill?
 
  • #8
Ivan Seeking
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Originally posted by jby
What do you mean?

I don't know.

Although I got this directly from Dr. Steve Carlip -
http://www.physics.ucdavis.edu/Text/Carlip.html

- I am not sure if this information is on his web site. Quantum Cosmology sites should have some discussions.

Perhaps someone else can help here?
 
  • #9
jeff
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This pointless post was brought to you by the three stooges smileys
 
  • #10
heumpje
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Originally posted by jby
Why not? What makes it difficult compared to microscopic objects?
If we were to start off a search to develop the wavefunction for a black hole, what are the conditions must the wavefunction that we will get fulfill?

Normally (for microscopic objects that is) we look for eigenstates of the Hamiltonian but a macroscopic object is not in an eigenstate.
 
  • #11
Originally posted by heumpje
Normally (for microscopic objects that is) we look for eigenstates of the Hamiltonian but a macroscopic object is not in an eigenstate.

In this quantum case, how do you exactly explain eigenstate? And why doesn't a macroscopic object be in an eigenstate? Can there be any chances that the object be in an eigenstate?
 

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