Wavelength and Diffraction

  • Thread starter Yuqing
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  • #1
Yuqing
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I've been told that longer wavelengths are able to diffract more than short wavelengths. The hyperphysics page on sound wave diffraction also states this fact. Nothing I've read have explained why exactly longer wavelengths are able to diffract more than shorter wavelengths, so that's my question here.

Also, the hyperphysics page also mentions about wavelengths and their ability to transfer information. Electron microscopes are able to produce images of smaller items because the wavelength of the electron is smaller than visible light. How does a shorter wavelength help to produce a sharper image?
 

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  • #2
buffordboy23
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I've been told that longer wavelengths are able to diffract more than short wavelengths. The hyperphysics page on sound wave diffraction also states this fact. Nothing I've read have explained why exactly longer wavelengths are able to diffract more than shorter wavelengths, so that's my question here.

Have you seen the derivation for locating the minima in a single-slit diffraction experiment? What is the equation? Let m = 1, and then solve for theta, which is the angle from the central axis to the point at the first minima.
 

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