1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Waves On A String

  1. Mar 16, 2008 #1

    danago

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    [SOLVED] Waves On A String

    In the figure below, a string, tied to a sinusoidal oscillator at P and running over a support at Q, is stretched by a block of mass m. Separation L=1.2m, linear density 1.6 g/m, and the oscillator frequency 120 Hz. The amplitude of the motion at P is small enough for that point to be considered a node. A node also exists at Q. (a) What mass m allows the oscillator to set up the fourth harmonic on the string? (b) What standing wave mode, if any, can be set up if m=1kg?

    [​IMG]


    Part A
    For the string to be vibrating in its fourth harmonic, the wavelength of the wave must be half of the string length so that two full waves can fit on the piece of string simultaneously.

    [tex]
    \lambda = \frac{L}{2} = 0.6m
    [/tex]


    We can then use this to calculate the velocity of a wave in the string:

    [tex]

    v = \lambda f = 0.6(120) = 72ms^{ - 1}
    [/tex]

    Which allows the strings tension to be calculated:

    [tex]
    v = \sqrt {\frac{T}{\mu }} \Rightarrow T = v^2 \mu = 8.2994N
    [/tex]


    The mass of the block is therefore 0.85kg.

    Part B
    Knowing the mass of the block (thus the tension), the velocity of a wave in the string can be calculated:

    [tex]
    v = \sqrt {\frac{T}{\mu }} = \sqrt {\frac{{9.81}}{{0.0016}}} \approx 78.3ms^{ - 1}
    [/tex]



    The wavelength of a wave with frequency of 120Hz can then be calculated:

    [tex]

    \lambda = \frac{v}{f} = \frac{{78.3}}{{120}} = 0.6525m
    [/tex]


    This wavelength does not corrospond to a specific harmonic number, so would this therefore mean that the 120Hz wave does not create any standing wave in the string?
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2008
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 16, 2008 #2
    What is Your take on this:
    A specific harmonic number is not necessary for resonance.
     
  4. Mar 16, 2008 #3

    danago

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I guess thats where im a little confused.

    From what i understand, a specific harmonic number is required for resonance.
     
  5. Mar 16, 2008 #4

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    It's difficult to comment on your work since essential information is missing from the problem statement. (When you cut and pasted, some numbers must have gotten lost.)
     
  6. Mar 16, 2008 #5

    danago

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Oh sorry, i didnt realise :redface: Ive fixed it now.
     
  7. Mar 16, 2008 #6

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Sounds right to me.
     
  8. Mar 16, 2008 #7

    danago

    User Avatar
    Gold Member


    Ok, good to hear :)

    Thanks for the confirmation.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Waves On A String
  1. Waves (Strings) (Replies: 1)

  2. Waves on a string. (Replies: 3)

  3. Waves on a string (Replies: 3)

  4. Waves in a string (Replies: 1)

  5. Waves on a string (Replies: 4)

Loading...