1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

: waves

  1. Jan 23, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A string from an Andrew Kirk violin is 30.0 cm long, with a linear density of 0.645 g/m. The violin is placed near a loudspeaker that is fed by an audio oscillator of variable frequency. It is found that the string is set into oscillation only at the frequencies 1312 Hz and 1749 Hz, as the frequency of the oscillator is varied over the range 1093 Hz to 1968 Hz. What is the tension in the string?



    2. Relevant equations
    v=sqrt(T/linear density) v=lambda x frequency


    3. The attempt at a solution
    I made these 2 equations equal to each other. However, I am unsure as to what proportion of L lambda is, and what to use for frequency. Once I know what to do here I can then isolate for tension and solve.

    Thanks in advance, any help would be GREATLY appreciated.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 23, 2009 #2

    Kurdt

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

  4. Jan 23, 2009 #3
    can you give me a further hint as to how to find what to use for frequency? Ive got less than an hour :S
     
  5. Jan 23, 2009 #4

    Kurdt

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    The frequencies given will be integer multiples of a fundamental frequency. So 1312Hz will be [itex]nf_1[/itex] for example and 1749Hz will be the next integer multple from that, so it'll be [itex](n+1)f_1[/itex].
     
  6. Jan 23, 2009 #5
    oh okay...so is a final answer of correct? 2.77N I have one try left :S:S:S:S
     
  7. Jan 23, 2009 #6

    rl.bhat

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    Since length of the string remains the same, for different frequencies the number of loops must be different.
    Hence 1312*(n+1) = 1749*n. Solve for n and then find tension.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: : waves
  1. Sound wave (Replies: 0)

Loading...