Wedding Vows: Love, Honour and Obey?

  • Thread starter verdigris
  • Start date
In summary: And they end up taking the low road and leaving. Some people are supposed to be married, most are not. In summary, the conversation discusses various aspects of a wedding ceremony, including vows, expectations, and traditional elements. There is also mention of the importance of staying true to vows and the potential consequences of getting married for the wrong reasons. Overall, the conversation highlights the complexity and challenges of marriage.
  • #1
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What should a man and woman say to each other in a wedding ceremony?
 
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  • #2
love, honor, and cherish?
 
  • #3
What do you mean by love,what do you mean by honor and what do you mean by cherish?
 
  • #4
can't wait for that honeymoon sex?
 
  • #5
verdigris said:
What should a man and woman say to each other in a wedding ceremony?

"Sign here, here, and initial there that you are waiving the 'obey' clause."
 
  • #6
"I've changed my mind".
 
  • #7
Math Is Hard said:
love, honor, and cherish?
Yep! :approve:
 
  • #8
When I was little, I thought it was "love, honor, and cherries". :smile:
 
  • #9
Be kind to each other?
 
  • #10
verdigris said:
What should a man and woman say to each other in a wedding ceremony?

The usual yada-yada-yada.

They should save their imagination for a more romantic moment.
 
  • #11
radou said:
The usual yada-yada-yada.
You are watching too closely work of Jerry Seinfeld_^^_ (and Quentin Tarantino>>)?:wink:
 
  • #12
"I promise to get up when the baby cries at night, feed the baby, change the baby and get the baby back to sleep then go to work and come home and make dinner, wash the dishes, pay the bills, play with the baby, listen to my spouse's complaints and praises, feed the baby, play in the tub with the baby, play some more, vacuum the living room and babie's room, fix the squeek in the stairs and paint the spare room for the inlaws, feed/change the baby, order more diapers, go grocery shopping, go to bed wake up with the crying baby, feed the baby, rock the baby, change the baby, cook the zuccini for the baby, rock the baby back to sleep and go to work and more, to the end of time."
 
  • #13
tehno said:
You are watching too closely work of Jerry Seinfeld_^^_ (and Quentin Tarantino>>)?:wink:

I know I'm obvious. :approve:
 
  • #14
baywax said:
"I promise to get up when the baby cries at night, feed the baby, change the baby and get the baby back to sleep then go to work and come home and make dinner, wash the dishes, pay the bills, play with the baby, listen to my spouse's complaints and praises, feed the baby, play in the tub with the baby, play some more, vacuum the living room and babie's room, fix the squeek in the stairs and paint the spare room for the inlaws, feed/change the baby, order more diapers, go grocery shopping, go to bed wake up with the crying baby, feed the baby, rock the baby, change the baby, cook the zuccini for the baby, rock the baby back to sleep and go to work and more, to the end of time."

Gotta love a baby who eats zucchini!
 
  • #15
Ronnin said:
Gotta love a baby who eats zucchini!

Its a good trick for latenite/earlymorning baby munchies.

grind up the (edit)steamed zucc in a blender

pour into ice cube tray

freeze

remove (edit:1 or 2 cubes) and melt in sauce pan

feed self and child.

go to work:zzz:

edit: zucc cubes double as teethers. for those new teeth also try a frozen wash cloth, yummy.
 
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  • #16
I'm a big fan of the classics. You know, "till death do us part" and all that jaz.
 
  • #17
4lb of love
1 lb butter of youth
1/2 lb of good looks
l lb sweet temper
1 lb of blindness for faults
1 lb of self forgetfulness
l lb of pounded wit
lb of good humor
2 tablespoons of sweet argument
1 pint of rippling laughter
1 wine glass of common sense
1 oz modesty

Put in the love, good looks and sweet temper into a well furnished house. Beat the butter of youth to a cream, and mix well together with the blindness of faults. Stir the pounded wit and good humor into the sweet argument, and then add the rippling laughter and common sense. Work the whole together until everything is well mixed, and bake gently for ever.

It would have worked for me but I set the oven to high and ended up getting a divorce.
We also had too much argument (the unsweetened kind) and not enough blindness for faults.

I still like to cook though.
 
  • #18
verdigris said:
What should a man and woman say to each other in a wedding ceremony?
I love you.
 
  • #19
verdigris said:
What should a man and woman say to each other in a wedding ceremony?

When are we having sex?
 
  • #20
what will they say or what are they thinking?

say

man) tell blah blah to slow down with the drinking lol

woman) blah blah is f'n up my wedding

thinking

man) you better love me, this cost of this ring will have me on my knees

woman) i hope he doesn't expect sex after...

just a guess that these will pop up at some point. :rofl:
 
  • #21
JonF said:
I'm a big fan of the classics. You know, "till death do us part" and all that jaz.

Damn straight!

That's the whole point of doing the ceremony in front of the family, friends and guests. You make a vow. You have witnesses.

People seem to have forgotten (including me) the importance of a vow. For the past few decades its been a big contest and a bragging right when you've had 5 wives or husbands. It like notches in yar guitar for every affair on a road tour.

Vows are meant for sticking to. If that sounds stupid and impossible, don't make vows and don't get married.:mad::bugeye:
 
  • #22
now who would put a notch on a good guitar?

i'd have to agree, after the third marriage that the guy (from my point of view) doesn't know what he's doing.
 
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  • #23
light_bulb said:
now who would put a notch on a good guitar?

i'd have to agree, after the third marriage that the guy (from my point of view) doesn't know what he's doing.

Its often a case of "parental role model takus overus". For some reason, if your parents stayed married and went on and on about marrage, kids, the stationwagon and so forth, and you heard and witenssed all of it as an infant, toddler and child, it is engrained in your waking psyche as the way to live your life.

Now, when a man or woman actually take the plunge and get married, sometimes they realize the person, the situation and the demands of the position are not something they can tolerate. They got into the situation because of a delusion instilled practically in their subconsciousby their parents and peers, then, they find out its really not something they can withstand.

Then they get out.

Then, memory being as falable as it is, they basically follow the same urge from the subconsciousand from the voices that are there from their role models, their parents and peers. Then... the whole thing collapses again because they are not suited to commitment, endurance, empathy, tolerance, forgiveness, love, routine, or whatever.

That's my take on it anyway. And guess what, who really suffers through this ****, its usually the children, if there are any.
 
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1. What is the significance of including "love, honour, and obey" in wedding vows?

The phrase "love, honour, and obey" has been a traditional part of wedding vows for centuries. It represents the fundamental principles of a marriage, emphasizing the importance of love, respect, and commitment between partners.

2. Is it mandatory to include "obey" in modern wedding vows?

No, it is not mandatory to include "obey" in modern wedding vows. In recent years, many couples have chosen to omit this phrase as it can be seen as outdated and unequal in terms of gender roles. It is ultimately up to the couple to decide what language feels most authentic to their relationship.

3. Are there alternatives to "obey" that can be used in wedding vows?

Yes, there are alternative phrases that can be used in place of "obey" in wedding vows. Some popular options include "cherish," "support," and "honor and respect." These phrases still convey the idea of mutual respect and commitment without the negative connotations of "obey."

4. What is the history behind including "obey" in wedding vows?

The inclusion of "obey" in wedding vows dates back to the medieval era when marriage was seen as a transaction between families. The wife was expected to obey and submit to her husband's authority. As societal attitudes and gender roles have evolved, the use of "obey" in wedding vows has become less common.

5. Can the wording of wedding vows be customized to fit the couple's beliefs and values?

Yes, absolutely. Wedding vows are a personal and meaningful expression of love and commitment between two individuals. As such, they can be customized to reflect the couple's beliefs, values, and unique relationship. Many couples choose to write their own vows, incorporating language that feels most authentic to them.

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