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Weddings are stupid

  1. Aug 17, 2007 #1
    Im cleaning my basement and watching TV, so I was watching this show on VH1 about some guy getting married. This guy lives in LA and has loads and loads of money. So they go to the Jewelry store and the lady working there brings out a diamond necklace, bracelet, and ear rings, and his woman says, these are so nice they sparkle! :!!) So he says......fine. Then the lady brings out some pearls. Then his woman says, "Oh, I need these new pearls for the rehearsal in my rehearsal dress", with big puppy-dog eyes. Ok fine, the chump buys them too. Total: $180k.

    Then they go to buy cards. So they get a cigar bar, each cigar costing 40 bucks. Invitation cards, matches, napkins and all kinds of other crap with there name on it. Cost: $16k

    NEXT, the go to the florist and get some sort of stupid thing you stand under with flowers and 'little fake diamonds they put in each flower', with a martini bar made of solid ice where the bartender pours your drink and it slides down the ice and funnels into your martini glass. Cost: $17k.

    And all the while his wife is having an orgasm in her pants every time the other women tell her how expensive some part of her wedding is going to cost "te-he-hehe!".

    Now, I got nothing against a guy being rich. But this guy is the biggest chump in the world. And the best part is every time the tell him the price he looks like he just had another hernia. :rofl:

    Seriously, grow some balls man.

    I think you should send out a card with a picture of you and your wife saying you got married. The End.

    I promise you two people that shallow are getting divorced, its just a matter of time, and judging from the two it will be because of her complaining and probably wasting his money.

    When I took trumpet back in high school (But not AT school), my teacher used to do weddings and events etc. He told me about how people would spend thousands and thousands, almost $100k on their wedding. I just dont see the logic in that, or weddings for that matter. It sounds like a big sham to me.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2007
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  3. Aug 17, 2007 #2

    Ivan Seeking

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    You should consider becoming a Catholic priest.
     
  4. Aug 17, 2007 #3

    Danger

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    If W and I ever make it official, it'll be her, me, and a justice of the peace. Maybe a cash bar party afterward, with 'no gifts' requested, just so those of our friends who give a **** can celebrate. She's already had 2 'girlie' weddings; this one is mine. :devil:
     
  5. Aug 17, 2007 #4
    My wife and I spent just under $4k on our wedding. And that was for everthing, her rings, dress, the facility, dinner afterwards. Everything. You don't have to spend ridiculous amounts if you don't want to (and if your bride to be isn't a gold digging whore)
     
  6. Aug 17, 2007 #5

    ranger

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    I'm sick of telling people this. But the number one response: It's a very special occasion.
     
  7. Aug 17, 2007 #6
    I can't stand it when people write those wedding invitations with the following closing line : "To help us achieve our dreams, please donate a small yet substantial amount of $$ onto account nr ***"

    That's rude and pathetic.

    marlon
     
  8. Aug 17, 2007 #7

    Kurdt

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  9. Aug 17, 2007 #8

    DaveC426913

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    TV is not real life. Everything is sensationalized for the audience. Do you think that, when they scripted the show, they didn't anticipate your reaction? You're supposed to be agog.
     
  10. Aug 17, 2007 #9

    radou

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    Right. But TV easily becomes real life. Hence, it is real life.

    Btw, I want a maximum of 20 people on my wedding. I hate sensations. Weddings worth thousands of bucks (or whatever) with hundreds of people are primitive.
     
  11. Aug 17, 2007 #10
    this is the reason why i'm never going to marry, she'll love me for me :-] ... then i wake up ;)
     
  12. Aug 17, 2007 #11
    I agree hollywood and tv show wedding are soooo annoying and ridiculous, but overall I don't see a problem spending a bit of cash to have a good time. But most spending should be on the reception, that is where the fun is. I agree with cheap invites...
     
  13. Aug 17, 2007 #12

    Moonbear

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    That's called eloping. Very effective too. Worked for two of my aunts (my grandparents never approved of their choice of husbands). My one uncle passed away a few years ago after a long marriage, the other aunt and uncle are still happily married...you don't need a fancy wedding to have a happy marriage.

    Quite possibly. If the wedding is more important than the marriage, it's possible.

    The way I see it, if you can afford it, don't have to take out loans, don't need to put off buying a first house together, don't have to dip into your retirement savings, etc., then do what you enjoy with your money, even if it's for a one-time (hopefully) event. I don't have a real problem with someone who is filthy rich having a showy, extravagant wedding. On the other hand, when someone can't afford it, or take out loans to pay for their wedding, or have a huge wedding then wind up having to live in a run-down one-bedroom apartment because they can't afford a better home together, then it's just insane. And, of course it's important to find someone who will share your perspective on this...that will say a lot about your compatibility together.

    Wow, I've never heard of that before! I agree, that's really a tacky thing to do.

    I was considering that if I ever get married, I already have everything I need for a household, and no need to be extravagant with a wedding (though, I do want a big party, but no need to waste money on poofy dresses and diamond rings, etc.), I'd put a suggestion in the cards that in lieu of a gift registry, I'd prefer donations made to a particular charity. I think that would be much better than getting fancy toasters and vases and picture frames that I don't need.
     
  14. Aug 17, 2007 #13
    I always wondered about gift registeries. I think the avg age ppl get married is 26? Shouldn't you already have everything you need? I think the charity idea is good instead of brainstorming things to put on a list.
     
  15. Aug 17, 2007 #14

    Moonbear

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    I don't know what age people commonly get married. People like me skew the average way off. I knew a lot of people who got married soon after college, so were setting up the first household at the time. Nonetheless, they also focused more on things like china and silver patterns rather than stuff they actually needed. I also like the idea of a Home Depot registry for those who are in the process of buying a new house together. But, yeah, it seems more common that people live independently for a while before moving in together, and often have more of a problem with too many duplicate items already in their possession than that they really need a lot of stuff. Some use it as an opportunity to "upgrade" to better quality stuff. But, yeah, a lot of times it's a stretch. I think the whole registry idea is just to avoid having Aunt Hilda give you some pink floral quilt she is just sure you'll love for the master bedroom. :rolleyes: It's kind of tacky too, but started out of practicality of avoiding having people keep asking what it was you wanted, what china pattern did you pick, etc, and avoids the other post-wedding tradition of spending your first month of married life standing in lines to return duplicate items. But if you don't need stuff, why go nuts thinking of things to add? (Hmm...then again, does Sears have a registry? Might be fun to add on the riding lawnmower...that's the only thing I don't have that I could envision needing/wanting.)
     
  16. Aug 17, 2007 #15
    Actually, that's quite common out here in Belgium. Recently some cousins of mine got married and all had that particular phrase on their wedding invitation cards.

    marlon
     
  17. Aug 17, 2007 #16

    turbo

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    When my wife and I got hitched, it was in our little one-BR apartment. The JP was a young lady that my wife graduated with, the best man was my best friend and her maid of honor was her closest friend. That was it. The mill that we both worked at had shut down and we couldn't afford anything more than a simple civil ceremony, and frankly, neither of us wanted to get married in a church anyway. BTW, both the bride and groom were wearing T-shirts and jeans. When we told our families, they insisted on having a pot-luck reception dinner. I provided the stereo and one of my brothers in law DJ'd all night. The "open bar" was a keg provided by a couple of other brothers in law. It was very simple, and great fun at minimal cost.
     
  18. Aug 17, 2007 #17

    Evo

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    I got married at the courthouse on my lunch hour. No party, no wedding gown, no honeymoon (we were both too busy), we didn't tell anyone because we didn't want anyone to feel obligated to buy us anything. I had one of my own diamonds reset for my ring, which I paid for.

    Cost of wedding, $5 for the marriage license.
     
  19. Aug 17, 2007 #18
    I am sorry but that is very sad. I also don't believe you were too busy. I mean, couldn't you get married on a saturday or sunday ? I guess you just did not take the time for this marriage. Maybe you did not really want it. Actually, does this marriage still exist ?

    marlon
     
  20. Aug 17, 2007 #19

    Evo

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    We were married for 17 years. The courthouse isn't open for marriages on the weekend. I hate weddings, I won't even attend them, and I definitely did not want one. The money I saved paid off my new BMW.

    We were already living together, getting married was just a legal matter for taxes and insurance.
     
  21. Aug 17, 2007 #20

    mgb_phys

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    My parents, her parents, two friends as witnesses.
    We had been living together for 3years when I got a postdoc in the USA - needed to make here 'official'. Now been married for nearly 10years.

    I think that today the size of the wedding is inversally proportional to the chances for the marriage.
     
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